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Farm Kids: What Do You Remember?

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  • Farm Kids: What Do You Remember?

    Harvest Public Media is looking for farm kids (high school and younger) for their regular "My Farm Roots" series.http://www.agweb.com/article/in-sear...A-alison-rice/

    If you're too, ahem, experienced to qualify for their query (as in you're no longer a teenager!), we'd love to hear your stories here. What are your favorite memories of growing up on the farm? Least favorite? Let us know.

  • #2
    SOOO you REALLY believe you have a younger following on this site...lol...I'll just wait awhile and see who fills in this gap



    go for it people, there are lots of fun and not so fun memories to get this site back off the ground!

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    • #3
      OH Boy - A - I think Dennis - No I know Dennis is right - But I have some great memories from growing up on our farm - But -As Dennis -- I think I will wait - lol Besides - it will take me days to look up all the words in my ECI Dic-sun-ary

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      • #4
        I can't imagine that there are many or any young people reading AgWeb. Chitt, there aren't many adults here anymore. It would be interesting hearing about the memories of growing up on the farm. Usually recalling memories takes more space and typing skills than I possess. Of course at my age, I don't remember what I had for breakfast or if I even had breakfast. But I remember my childhood and the minor incidents that made growing up farming a fun experience. When I was young, life was an adventure and I always enjoyed new challenges and experiences. Now a cold drink and good Bullchitt makes me a happy camper.

        At least my childhood never led me to fear snakes, but childhood stories from my Dad sure made me dislike ratts. Some story about him having a rat run up his pants, all way to his belt.
        Dammed near made him a Caitlin LOL

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        • #5
          I can remember when I was a young child . My mother told me to go get the eggs. I hated to do it because the hens would peck me. However I was more afraid of my mother than the chickens. I was not tall enough to look in the nests and when I reached up in the nest I picked up a snake. It was not poisonous , but never the less it was a snake. I ran to the house and my mother made me go back. Of course the damn snake was gone by then. It then became my job to get the eggs every day.

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          • #6
            I remember the rats when shelling corn also. One ran up some ones pant leg and breached the belt line ( probably due to him trying to get his pants off} and went inside the back of his shirt. He was yelling HIT it! HIT IT!. About that time some one swung their CAST IRON scoop! Boy what a mess! After that we tied string around our pant legs..
            I also remember one hot day the scoopers were hot and tired and the farmer refused them a break. Well about the time the boys were good and pooped out and pissed over no break they got into a big ole snakes nest. They all gave a big shove of corn about the time that nest of snakes hit the sheller drag. Can you believe not one of them scoopers helped unplug the sheller?

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            • #7
              One of my vivid memories [early 60's] was our hired man and myself moving a Hereford bull. We're dairymen, but dad let Mr. Tapp, a neighbor, use our high pedigreed Holstein bull to breed a coupla of his heifers. It came back with VD, ruined a few of our h eifers, and of course was shipped. Dad's buddy Ray Wiersma located this Hereford for him as a fill in til a Holstein could e located. That little 700 pound beefer was MEAN!! All he would do was charge you. So envision this...our 2 farms were 1/2 mile apart on opposite ends of the property. With John on the20 foot chain snapped to the ring in his nose, he was gwanna lead him to the other farm. NOT!! So I was on the TAIL of that little bugger the whole way using it as a rudder so as he charged John, El Toro would miss him!! I was laughing the whole way, which was prolly 2 miles in the end. To dads credit, that was the only time we moved him, cuz he left. Boy, I wish I had that level of energy today!!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by PERCY View Post
                One of my vivid memories [early 60's] was our hired man and myself moving a Hereford bull. We're dairymen, but dad let Mr. Tapp, a neighbor, use our high pedigreed Holstein bull to breed a coupla of his heifers. It came back with VD, ruined a few of our h eifers, and of course was shipped. Dad's buddy Ray Wiersma located this Hereford for him as a fill in til a Holstein could e located. That little 700 pound beefer was MEAN!! All he would do was charge you. So envision this...our 2 farms were 1/2 mile apart on opposite ends of the property. With John on the20 foot chain snapped to the ring in his nose, he was gwanna lead him to the other farm. NOT!! So I was on the TAIL of that little bugger the whole way using it as a rudder so as he charged John, El Toro would miss him!! I was laughing the whole way, which was prolly 2 miles in the end. To dads credit, that was the only time we moved him, cuz he left. Boy, I wish I had that level of energy today!!
                A film of that trip would have been priceless.

                When I was a little guy we had a large white rooster running free in the summer. He loved to chase anything that would run. I took me quite a while to learn to stand my ground. One day when we were getting rid of chickens after being dared to do so- I did the chasing and caught him. My father and brother couldn't believe it when I came out of the barn holding "the chasing rooster" by both legs just above the large spurs with his wings flopping all over. I had quite a bit of trouble getting one of them to take him from me. That rooster loved being the chaser not the chasee.

                As part of a few chickens that were allowed to roam for part of the summer we always seemed to have a few hens that laid some eggs far from the open coop where they weren't found immediately. We had a few incidents where we got in trouble for our rotten egg fights. 2 happened when we had company. One summer my cousin Carla from Cali was staying with our family for a few days. One day I discovered Carla and my older sister were scaling the inside wall of an empty hay loft to look out the windows above. When they discovered that I had followed them to the loft- I was told to "get lost". I then found one of those rotten eggs. I held it taunting the cousin who then said "you wouldn't dare". I simply threw the egg as a warning shot. The egg broke when it hit the barn wood many feet above her. The rotten yolk drizzled down onto her long blonde hair. I of course very quickly did as I was told and "got lost" for a while.

                We also had a mean buck sheep that was very territorial. He loved to chase and knock us to the ground. One summer we had the sheep in a fenced in lot here at home. We would slip into the lot get on an old hay rack and jump down to taunt the buck. We would race back to the rack when he turned to chase us. We of course had contests as to who could be the most daring, straying the furthest from the rack and still beat the buck back to the safety on top of the rack. My older brother decided he was going to show us just how daring he was. Across the lot at the other side was steep sided pile of clay. From our vantage point on the rack he waited until the buck was turned and far away from the rack. My brother then jumped down hollering as he raced towards that clay pile on the other side of the lot. The buck of course turned and was chasing him. At the bottom of the steep sided pile of clay my brother had a great lead. By the time he reached the top the buck was right there with him. The buck hit him in the butt and sent him rolling down the other side. We discovered that this buck sheep climbed a steep slope faster than we could. The buck was "king of the hill" that day.
                Last edited by jabber1; 08-12-2015, 03:55 AM.
                “Democracy is the worst form of government, -------------------------------except for all the others.”

                ― Winston S. Churchill

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                • #9
                  Sometime I will post a few pictures of this years oats. Big crop!!!!

                  Back when I was in the first grade, my father promised me I could drive the tractor when they picked op the shocked bundles. What anticipation!!!!!! Drive tractor for the threshing crew. WOW
                  6 Years old and working with the beer drinking , copenhagen chewing, swearing threshing crew. WOW That thought still excites me after soooo many years. But just a few days before the oats could be cut, we got a strong windstorm and heavy rains. This made cutting the oats with a binder and shocking it impossible, so dear ole Dad got up the gumption to buy a John Deere 45 combine with a huge 10 foot cut and a Hume reel to pick up that downed oats.

                  My hopes were dashed. Here I was looking at this huge green bug that had taken away the binder, the thresh machine, the bundle hauling wagons, and my chance to work with that threshing crew, drink beer and get some chew. Plus I lost the chance to help shock the oats bundles. I had "helped" the year before. The neighbor I "helped" was old like 45!!! But he was heavy set and carried a pint bottle of moonshine that helped him survive the heat. Every half hour or so ole Joe would sit down in a shady spot, pull out his bottle and take a few swigs. While he was swigging I had to run a get a bottle of beer for Joe to whet his thirst after the shine. Well he would let me have a swig of the shine. small swig but good, and washed it down with some beer or lemonade. Put a pinch of copenhagen between the cheek and gum and back to work. Fun days that were ruined when my Dad bought a JD combine. I hated that damned machine. Farmers back then spread dairy manure on all the fields and they were never sprayed so we harvested mustard morning glory quackgrass ragweed and pigweed about 20% weeds and 80% oats on a good year. Well if anybody remembers a JD 45 combine, you will remember that wet green weeds were the death of the combines harvesting progress. Get in clean it out clean out the cylinder the feeder house and of course the auger and reel. Guess who got that job. Hated that combine Hated oats. Still hire someone to run the reaper.

                  I still wonder how I could be a straight A student and beem dummm enough to be a farmer

                  Farming is in your blood, If there actually are any young readers on AW, REMEMBER

                  There are very few careers that are more rewarding than providing the food and fiber for yourself and others

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                  • #10
                    My tractor driving started at age 7 when I could reach the clutch and brake pedals (with a little help from a 2x4 block of wood bolted to each one) on Dad's LA Jd. He made a manual lift 3 point for it and some 3 point equipment out of old horse drawn stuff. My first tasks were to pull the trailer down beside the corn rows as he shucked by hand. His day job was driving a truck but this is how he started farming, renting a 3 acre patch at the edge of town. Anyway, I thought I was spitting in tall cotton when I finally got to drive. Unfortunately I soon learned my first (of many) no-no's when I tried to cross a ditch straight with the 3 point blade on the back. Front tires on one side, blade on the other, rear tires churning in the air, steam coming from Dad's ears. Wouldn't be the last time I'd make steam come them. Sure wish I could spend one more afternoon with him doing something.

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                    • #11
                      I used to work on a dairy farm when I was 14-16. I drove my International Harvester utility 350 gas tractor to work every day. That was fun. One day the owner's son John had decided to take his new dog Reb to get the cows out of one field into another. He asked us boys to come and watch this new dog round up the cows. This guy loved to brag about anything and he just went on and on about how he had taught this dog to round up cows, blah blah blah. Well, we got to the field and we climbed out of the bed of his 1964 blue Chevy utility truck. " Come on Reb, get those cows" he said. I looked at my buddy who worked on the farm with me and I'm sure my eyebrows were raised and my eyeballs were rolling. Sure as chit that dog ran out there and gathered up those cows and here they came towards the gate opening. While the dog was doing his thing John started telling us how he had taught Reb everything he knew. "Yea, I taught that dog, blah blah blah" ....Just as the cows were about to the opening of the other field Reb tore around that herd and came to a stop right in front of the gateway to the other field and commenced to bark his azz off and scattered those dairy cows all over that 40 acres and proceeded to chase them to boot. That was funny enough in itself but then John started to yell God damn you Reb and then jumped into his Chevy and started to chase down the dog, meanwhile the boss has seen all the commotion as he was coming back to help with the cows. He puts his Ford 8N with a blade on the back in road gear and come bouncing back the lane hoping to help solve this situation. Of course we are just standing there watching all this unfold and laughing our azz'z off. I always thought John was a moron anyway. If you got into his truck ( he had one of those stencil makers ) and he had stenciled everything under the sun and stuck those stickers on for example....radio.. heater windshieldwiper, steering wheel, horn, dashboard, visor, you name it, etc...he even had one on his forehead......MORON That was the last day I worked on that farm. Hillarious!

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                      • #12
                        Greg, Now thats funny. A lot of had similar tales of woe or humor while growing.

                        Some of us have that kinda days even when we're old???? er????

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