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What to do with dumb kids

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  • What to do with dumb kids

    ]Reading Scores on National Exam Decline in Half the States


    WASHINGTON — The average eighth grade reading score on a nationally representative test declined among public school students in more than half of the states, according to data released Wednesday by the National Center for Education Statistics, the research arm of the Education Department.
    The dismal results were part of the release of the National Assessment of Educational Progress, known as the “nation’s report card.” The test assesses a sample of fourth and eighth grade students — more than 290,000 in each subject in 2019 — every other year.
    “Over the past decade, there has been no progress in either mathematics or reading performance, and the lowest-performing students are doing worse,” Peggy Carr, the associate commissioner of the center, said in a statement.
    Such findings will inevitably prompt demands for policy change. In a statement, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, who is championing a $5 billion school choice program, said that the results “must be America’s wake-up call.”
    “We can neither excuse them away, nor simply throw more money at the problem,” she said.
    That vision is in stark contrast to the one that has emerged in the Democratic presidential primary. All the leading candidates have suggested spending billions more federal dollars on traditional public schools, and two of the front-runners — Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders — have proposed slowing the growth of the charter school sector.
    The losses on the national exam were steepest for students who had been struggling the most, a segment that is the focus of many school reform policies.
    Eighth graders at the bottom 10th percentile of reading achievement lost 6 points on the exam compared with similar students two years ago, while students at the 50th percentile lost 3 points and students at the 90th percentile — top achievers — lost only 1 point.
    “Eighth grade is a transitional point in preparing students for success in high school, so it is critical that researchers further explore the declines we are seeing here,” Carr said.
    White, black, Hispanic, Native American and multiracial students all lost ground in eighth grade reading, while there was no significant change for Asian students.
    Washington, one of 27 cities to participate in a separate analysis of urban school systems, was the only city or state to see significant improvement in eighth grade reading, according to a federal analysis of the data.
    This year, 31 states noted a drop of 2 to 7 points in their average eighth grade reading score — which the federal government deemed significant — compared with their performances in 2017. Indiana, New Hampshire and Virginia were the states with the largest declines among eighth graders.
    Fourth grade reading scores dropped in 17 states, with New Jersey having the largest decline, 6 points; only one state, Mississippi, improved, the data showed.
    States’ average math scores fared considerably better, particularly among fourth graders. Nine states had significant increases in fourth grade math, compared with 2017 numbers, with Mississippi again leading the pack. The eighth grade score in three states improved, while six noted a decline.
    While the most recent results are disappointing, trends in student achievement look more positive over the long term. American students have made large gains in math and small gains in reading since 1990, but those improvements began to level out around 2009. There is no consensus among experts as to why.
    The Council of the Great City Schools, a coalition of large urban school systems, said it saw a hopeful story in the new data. Over the past two decades, students in cities have moved closer to national achievement averages in both math and reading.
    “The fact that large city schools have cut their performance gap with the nation in about half is even more remarkable when you consider that our schools have substantially more poor students and English-language learners than the average public school across the nation,” the group said in a statement. Such results “suggest that the nation’s urban public schools are adding substantially more educational value than the average school.”
    The National Assessment of Educational Progress is considered a “low stakes” exam, because schools and teachers do not lose funding, pay or autonomy based on how their students perform. Some researchers consider the test the gold-standard measure of learning nationwide, while others argue it is unfair to judge schools using an exam that may have little connection to the material teachers cover in the classroom.
    DeVos said the 2019 scores reflected a “student achievement crisis,” where progress had stalled, two out of three children were not proficient readers, and outcomes continued to worsen for the most vulnerable students.
    “Every American family needs to open the nation’s report card this year and think about what it means for their child and for our country’s future,” she said. “The results are, frankly, devastating.”



    my take on this is first reeducate the teachers I blame this sole ly on the teachers they are too scared to Fail a student if the student continually has Fs on test scores Fail him but --the Teacher --is afraid of the admastration and particularly of the kids parents in real life

    get beat up on the street ---MY experience first off believe it or not my first eight grades we took in a Catholic school with Four {4} rooms you heard me right the teachers were four full habit NUNS each had two classes1s through 4 not bad 5th an 6t that Nun ruled with a Iron fist she kept two boards of education handy and could swing them I still to this day can pronounce my Nouns and Pronouns front wards and backwards 7t and 8t not bad then we go to high school I though it was party time had a first year teacher that just did not drive the point home will I received my first F IN school I ALL OF a sudden had to adapt to this new kind of teaching they did not drive it home you learned it or you failed I still remember the day I received that report card A I still will never forget my 5t and 6t grade teacher Sister Pat god bless her sole---------------------------------dave
    Last edited by davidm479; 10-31-2019, 09:42 AM.

  • #2

    take those computers a way from them spicily during school-------------------------dave

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    • #3
      We see the same problems, have similar remedies, maybe some are to hard line or old fashioned, but it still goes back to HOME/FAMILY, the village
      can only do so much...
      The President of Oklahoma Wesleyan University gave a lecture to students they’ll never forget. Recently, a student complained about a sermon that made him feel guilty and blamed the school for making students feel uncomfortable. This is not uncommon. Many universities now are so afraid of offending even one student, …

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      • #4
        It's not just the kids. We have older people who can not spell worth a damn or know how to use proper punctuation among us also.

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        • #5
          You know, Uncle C, that I've given up on some people spelling correctly. Some students never 'got it', in spite of teachers and parents efforts. Now we have them spelling[writing] with their thumbs[texting], and the abbreviations have me more confused than deciphering poorly spelld werds and centance struksure.

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          • #6
            I really do not car how well they can spell HE ll I can not do that very well my self but you sure need to know how to add and subtract and reason how to figure stuff out how it works how to fix it how to grow it and bring it in not just running a car around a track or shooting at a guy or goblin behind a tree if they had A SISTER PAT at age 10 to 12 they would know she would drive the point home------------------------------------dave

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            • #7
              ]$33,000 for a useless degree in law[/h]
              Imagine attending law school classes, doing homework, studying complicated topics like torts and contracts for three years, and finishing with a $33,000 degree that wouldn’t enable you to be a lawyer? A BuzzFeed News investigation highlights several online law schools that offer an Executive Juris Doctor degree that won’t allow graduates to practice law or qualify them to take bar exams. “Trying to describe it makes you look like a goddamned fool,” Brenda Cuney told BuzzFeed News after graduating from the unaccredited Concord Law School earlier this year. [BuzzFeed News

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              • #8
                Funny you bring that up I already know several Congress men and women that graduated their -------------------------------dave

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                • #9
                  The 2 keys to employment, to me, are ability and experience. Neither of these matter if you can't be dependable to show up for work. Don't enter the legal field of work if you can't spell; I've seen cases thrown out of court for grammatical errors. Always remember that 50% of the people graduated from the bottom 1/2 of the class.

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                  • #10
                    a very important point my fifth son is a certified Air craft mechanic out of the KC school the first week of school the rule was show up for work on time no exceptions school was from 7 am to 3pm Monday through Thursday FRIDAY was mak up day if you misted a day or were late all had to be re made if late or mist if not Monday you were gone no exceptions in other words it was just like milking twice a day every day no exceptions another instance two of my other boys are drillers you show up for work every day or you don"t have a job--------------------------------------------dave

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                    • #11
                      --[Trump Tried to Spell 'Republican' and Accidentally Inspired the RuPaul-Themed 'RuPublican Party'

                      QUOTE=PERCY;n470767]You know, Uncle C, that I've given up on some people spelling correctly. Some students never 'got it', in spite of teachers and parents efforts. Now we have them spelling[writing] with their thumbs[texting], and the abbreviations have me more confused than deciphering poorly spelld werds and centance struksure.[/QUOTE]

                      Percy what to o about this he can not spell as you say and its bin proven time and time again----------------------dave--------------I can not spell good either but I do not count

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                      • #12
                        Let's blame ECI and his dictionary😁
                        Don't get tripped by what's behind you

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by flyingRoot View Post
                          Let's blame ECI and his dictionary😁

                          DING DING DING !!!!! We have a winner !!

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                          • #14
                            LMAO...going to defend ECI on this one!

                            Our grand daughter, who was/is a speller, but in her grade school days, she competed in state competition spelling bee....and ECI offered her his dictionary, how ever
                            he spelled it.

                            Well, this past week she was in Indianapolis attending the National FFA Convention, for the third time, and "reporting"

                            this is I believe is her first article this convention..

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                            • #15
                              so here goes another tangent... lol

                              You may have to click on the triangle in the cicle a second time...maybe it is just this computer...
                               
                              Last edited by dennis1; 11-03-2019, 11:30 PM.

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