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  • ]China's Xi warns attempts to divide China will end in 'shuttered bones'




    ---------------------------------------Xii putting the warning out already this morning he will not take any Trump **** t-----------all it will take is one bad word just like the NBA deal-------------------------------dave


    Chinese President Xi Jinping attends the Conference on Dialogue of Asian Civilizations in BeijingBEIJING (Reuters) - Chinese President Xi Jinping warned on Sunday that any attempt to divide China will be crushed, as Beijing faces political challenges in months-long protests in Hong Kong and U.S. criticism over its treatment of Muslim minority groups.

    Last edited by davidm479; 10-13-2019, 08:57 AM.

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    • also sounds like trade deal tears down some barriers china has a habit of throwing up to shut out imports what is different this time the chinese had their heavy hitters at this meeting,talk is that trump and xi will sign phase 1 in 4-5 weeks in the mean time it'll be important to see more chinese purchases going forward not just beans and pork but ddg's,ethanol,and other US products,Fri. close was right up against june highs,should beans gap higher tonight it'll be a very good tech sigh we are going much higher.storm also could have a big impact as a big chunk of ND and ne SD had over 2 ft of snow very likely those area lost their bean crop or at the very least have big losses.It's hard for me to know what I've lost but my yields will no doubt be smaller than a week ago,don't think they'll pop back up

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      • Stef I did want to say it the other day but I have neve seen a bean pop back up MINE always get lower you may have to find some those bean lifters--------------dave

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        • China Denied U.S. Lawmakers Visas Over Taiwan Visit





          don"t count that extra money YET------------oh Xi it having a tantrum ---------------------------dave


          (Bloomberg) -- China denied entry visas to a U.S. congressional delegation, with Chinese officials telling one congressman’s staff members the visas would be granted for their trip only if they canceled a stop in Taiwan.
          Representative Sean Patrick Maloney, a New York Democrat, said in a Wall Street Journal op-ed that the quid pro quo amounted to “visa blackmail, designed to stanch the longstanding tradition of robust U.S. congressional engagement with Taiwan.“
          Maloney warned Beijing that “ham-handed and obtusely enforced pressure campaigns“ will only “invigorate congressional support for Taiwan.” He said he will be exploring ways for Congress to “reinforce U.S. support for Taiwan” in the coming months, though did not give any indication as to whether congressional leaders or the White House had signed on to his intentions.
          China and Taiwan have been governed separately since a nationalist government fled to Taipei more than 70 years ago during a civil war with Mao Zedong’s Communists. China considers Taiwan part of its territory and hasn’t ruled out military force to assert control over it.
          U.S. support for Taiwan recently has been expanding, with Senator Ted Cruz, a Texas Republican, last week becoming the first U.S. senator to attend a National Day event in Taipei in 35 years.
          Meanwhile, Senator Cory Gardner, a Colorado Republican, and Taiwanese Foreign Minister Joseph Wu also wrote a commentary last week in the Washington-based Hill newspaper, calling for strengthening Taiwan-U.S. relations to counter rising Chinese influence in the Pacific.


          Last edited by davidm479; 10-13-2019, 09:52 PM.

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          • Sorry to hear about your beans. Does you head have for and aft on it? I rented a mac Don head with headsight and fore and aft. I got under a lot of flat beans. The down side of that is that beans that have been on the ground a while tend to stay wet. After a week or so of warm weather they tend to slug things.
            I did get mine harvested that year. Start at 2 pm on the dry days and quit before 5. Or more commonly went until 5:15 when I plugged and then un plug until 9. LOL
            Last edited by iadave; 10-14-2019, 09:37 PM.

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            • [h=1]China Threatens to Retaliate If U.S. Enacts Hong Kong Bill[/h]
              the trad deal is waving in the wind its fast leaving ---------------------------------dave

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              • not sure if grains are consolidating at the highs or getting ready to correct but with weather the way it is and yields getting hit agian with to much rain and wind eventually we probably go higher,US$ acts like its topped which provides some support,weekly export sales ho um at best little 0ver 200,000mt sold to china rported on the daily system,also reported china buys 20 billion US ag 1st year of phase 1 40-50 after that which seems high and difficult to ship the much,20 billion would get back to pre tarrif levels

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                • if one needs to make some cash sales off the combine yet, should we make them now with this strong basis, or wait a little longer............any rise in futures may be taken away by the basis widening

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                  • Village, I agree with your thinking. I just sold some corn to our local E plant for delivery this week at $3.89 with a plus 3 cent basis. Their bid for November goes to minus 18 cents, but as you know that can change. The way I look at this is this is the first of my 2019 corn priced and I hope to do better with what is going in to the bins. I did say hope! I have been wrong before, time will tell. Steffy, were you able to pick up those beans that got snow on them? Just wondering how that turned out. Thanks

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                    • markets up 1 or 2 one day down 1 or two the next snow flying heavy rain does not mater we have no direction and no place to go with ower product ----------------------------------dave

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                      • Better re-think that wheat... lmao

                        It better not grow in those totes, but I see a plus 9 on the board right now...

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                        • as I sid this morning up down DOW flat even zilk nada strange day indeed---------------------------------------dave

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                          • brite spot bean meal up 10 cents whats with that everything else is down------------------------------dave

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                            • Trade Talks Hit Bump as China Resists U.S. Demands on Agricultural Purchases


                              -a lot more wrangling must take place they are not ready yet ------------------------------------------------dave

                              Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. .
                              A U.S. demand that China spell out how it plans to reach as much as $50 billion in agricultural imports annually has become a sticking point in negotiations on a phase one trade deal, according to people familiar with the matter.
                              Chinese negotiators are resisting a proposal from American officials that it provide monthly, quarterly and annual targets for purchases, said the people, who asked not to be named discussing the private talks. China also insists that the two sides must agree to rollback tariffs in phases if a deal is reached, the people said. U.S. President Donald Trump said earlier he had not agreed to ease any levies.
                              A teleconference between deputy-level officials scheduled for late Wednesday night in Washington was expected to cover issues beyond agriculture such as intellectual property, forced technology transfer and enforcement, people familiar with the matter said.
                              There have been small signs that China and the U.S. are easing restrictions on imports of each other’s goods. On Thursday, China lifted a ban on American poultry that began in 2015, saying it would allow imports from qualified suppliers. The move comes after the U.S. Department of Agriculture made a similar decision to allow Chinese poultry into the U.S.
                              However, optimism that the U.S. and China are close to a limited trade deal has faded in recent days due to uncertainty over whether Washington would agree to rollback tariffs and also how any agreement would be enforced. Trump has said that the U.S. will substantially increase tariffs on China if the first step of a broader agreement isn’t reached.
                              China has also taken actions that could signal imports of U.S. farm goods are in jeopardy if talks sour. While China restarted purchases of some agricultural products as talks progressed, it is now delaying the unloading of American soybeans at its ports, the people said, which could slow down further purchases.
                              About 1.8 million tons of soybeans, mostly for state reserves, are being held up at China’s ports. Local buyers have to pay a hefty deposit to customs before they can collect refunds on the 30% tit-for-tat tariffs which China adopted because of the trade war. The deposits can cost as much as 60 million yuan ($8.5 million) per cargo and unloading can take about 28 days.
                              China’s Ministry of Commerce and General Administration of Customs did not immediately respond to faxes seeking comment on the enforcement mechanism and port delays respectively.
                              The two sides are conducting thorough talks on a phase one deal and removing existing tariffs is an important condition for an agreement, a Chinese commerce ministry spokesman reiterated at a regular briefing on Thursday. The Wall Street Journal reported earlier that China is wary of putting a numerical commitment into writing, citing people familiar.
                              Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping had planned to sign the partial agreement at an international conference this month in Chile that was later canceled because of social unrest in that country. A new site for the signing hasn’t been announced.
                              U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Chinese spending on U.S. farm goods will scale to an annual figure of $40 billion to $50 billion over two years as part of a partial trade agreement, though China has not publicly committed to that value and time frame.



                              Last edited by davidm479; 11-14-2019, 07:52 AM.

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