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  • there's a reason wheat acres have been the lowest in 50 years,yield have not increased like other crops and prices are poor,the USA is no longer a major exporter as we have become the last resort for importers,he world is awash in wheat I don't see a lot of upside unless the corn crop is as bad as some think then wheat may get some space in the feed rations to draw down stocks

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    • It looks to me that crop ratings finally got the markets attention. It has appeared Chicago did not want to believe this situation or the ratings. Our area in Northwest IA has suffered irreversible damage from dry weather the last 10 days. I believe poorly developed root systems were not able to chase water down fast enough and we lost crop potential on hillsides, areas with the best stands after a very wet Spring. I am looking for corn yields around 150 with an APH of 185 and who knows on the beans. Corn was all planted by May 20th but just to many wet areas that lost crop this Spring.
      Last edited by jboett; 09-11-2019, 01:00 PM. Reason: Had wrong plant date. Was done on May 20th.

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      • Apparently Crop Ratings are only pertinent for one trading session. Hopefully the WASDE report is a little more friendly tomorrow than last month.

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        • Originally posted by jboett View Post
          Apparently Crop Ratings are only pertinent for one trading session. Hopefully the WASDE report is a little more friendly tomorrow than last month.
          By the looks of the market this morning someone got ahold of the report a little early. Beans +19? Or was there a tweet about China? Its hard to keep track of what actually moves the market anymore.

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          • china was inquiring about buying some pork and beans

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            • report ho hum decreased corn and bean yield slightly also decreased demand some,oc corn stocks up 100 mb,beans stocks down 65mb,nc corn stocks about unchanged bean stocks down115mb.oc world stocks up 1 mmt corn down 2 mmt beans,nc world stocks dowm about 1mmt corn down 2.5 mmt beans mmt = million metic tonnes

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              • it's thought that china bot 600,000mt of US beans today,also they bot 10,000 mt of pork on the weekly export report,grains had good closes in spite of a hohum report,hog close limit up as far as the eye could see and cattle followed thru on the strong closes from earlier in the week.oct fats are about $5 off the lows and dec fat almost $7.packer tried to buy cattle 4-6 lower this week,with not much success had a call from a buyer offer $159 in the beef that would be $6 lower told him to go F*%! himself I did buy 5 load of tested open hfrs late last week and early this week 9 wts laid in for $120 if they don't work nothing will!

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                • hummmm I am just thinking here WHAT IFhummmm what if no deal OR even better yet deal and we mess with TIWAN and CHINA says wo stick it a lot of cards on the table here I think their is still no deal -------------------------------------------dave

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                  • brazil can start planting beans now as rust free period has passed,but it's very dry and hot and farmers are waiting for a good rain before they start,forcast has it staying hot a dry tho,if this keeps up to long then it will affect the 2nd crop of corn planted after bean harvest,another world event that needs to be watched is china's corn stocks thay now sit @ 56mmt down from 200mmt a couple years ago as they are abandoning their stock piling program,they also wan to start making ethanol but may lack the corn to do so as aggressively as they want add in the attacks on saudi energy and ethanol may be a big winner,It looks like demand for corn and beans could be returning throw in a poor crop here and SA and grains may have a glimmer of hope of better prices

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                    • usda reports 260,000 mt beans sold to china on daily system,looks like china making some good will buys before talks start,maybe just maybe a deal will get done

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                      • also saudi suspended oil shipments to china because of the attacks because of supply,so whether china likes it or not they may need the US good as at least we are a reliable supplier

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                        • Went into town this morning and saw that the local co-op raised gasoline prices 19 cents a gallon. Amazing, I thought the U.S. was self sufficient
                          in energy production. Or, at least it would take more then two days for imported crude could be shipped here, refined, and delivered to our local
                          co-op. What is more amazing, E-85 went up also. I couldn't resist it, I stopped and asked the manager if an ethanol refinery had also been
                          the victim of a terrorist attack which warranted a price increase in ethanol. He replied that the ethanol plant which supplies our area had raised
                          there prices a dime a gallon. OK, I can see that. There margins have been pretty slim the last year.
                          On returning home this evening from a 50 mile trip to watch and grandson play football, I see the co-op is at $2.59 for gas, while the Caseys Convenience
                          Store down the road is $2.45. Maybe that quick profit by the co-op will be reflected in our dividends??????

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                          • export sales were well above trrade est for corn ,beans and meal,US$ seems like it is topping should be supportive grains indigo has corn production 10% below USDA,beans 8% lower,early yields for both corn and beans lower yoy

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                            • ]Congress Is Bailing Out Trump's Farm Bailout-------------------------------LOOK WHO IS HELPING WHO-----------------------------DAVE


                              WASHINGTON ― Democrats are doing the Trump administration a favor that Republicans wouldn’t have done for Obama.
                              President Donald Trump has given so much extra money to American farms harmed by his trade policy that the U.S. Department of Agriculture is nearing a legal limit.
                              Now lawmakers are stepping in to save the farm bailout, boosting the USDA’s borrowing authority so it can continue to pay farmers who are unable to sell soybeans and other crops to Chinese buyers because of the Trump trade war.
                              The House approved a resolution Thursday by a mostly Democratic 301-123 vote to fund the government until Nov. 21. The resolution, which the Senate will likely approve next week, included language the Trump administration wanted to keep the farm funds flowing.
                              The broader funding bill could have been a point of leverage for Democrats battling the Trump administration for all manner of testimony and documents — but Democrats have declined to use it. House Appropriations Chair Nita Lowey (D-N.Y.) had previously threatened ([url]https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2019/09/12/top-democrat-attempts-block-trump-paying-farm-bailout-money-setting-up-battle-over-trade-war-tactics/[/url]) to omit language to continue the trade bailout this year, but settled for a provision requiring more detailed reports to Congress.
                              In a statement, Lowey said the bill denied the Trump administration a blank check.
                              “I am particularly proud that the legislation requires the Trump administration account for the costs of the trade war for farmers on a state-by-state and commodity-by-commodity basis, a critical step to understanding the damage that is being wrought on farmers and consumers.” Lowey said.
                              Still, Republicans hissed at Democrats for having even considered using American farmers as leverage in a budget negotiation.
                              “America’s farmers should NEVER be used as political pawns again,” Republican leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) said in a tweet ([url]https://twitter.com/GOPLeader/status/1174722648619868161[/url]).
                              Republicans should probably be grateful. President Barack Obama used the same bailout authority in 2010, sending $348 million to farmers hurt by heavy rains in Arkansas, Louisiana and Mississippi.
                              Republicans got mad. They accused Obama ([url]http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/08/21/AR2010082102517.html[/url]) of illegally trying to help struggling Sen. Blanche Lincoln (D-Ark.) win an election. And then they imposed new restrictions ([url]https://www.huffpost.com/entry/congress-aid-farmers-trump-obama_n_5b7713b8e4b018b93e93a59e[/url]) on the USDA’s ability to use its so-called Commodity Credit Corporation authority ― restrictions that remained in place until 2018, when Trump needed help.
                              After Trump imposed tariffs on Chinese imports as part of his effort to reduce the U.S. trade deficit, China retaliated by slapping duties on American imports. Farmers are big exporters and were particularly vulnerable to the retaliation.
                              Taxpayers for Common Sense, a conservative anti-spending nonprofit, said ([url]https://www.taxpayer.net/budget-appropriations-tax/continuing-resolution/[/url]) the administration has used the CCC to “buy itself some political will amongst farmers” and that the new bill will allow the administration “to continue showering farming and ranching businesses with subsidies.”
                              If the agricultural assistance is designed to help Trump with rural voters, the Lincoln case is not a promising example. She lost badly in 2010.
                              Former House Agriculture Committee Chair Frank Lucas (R-Okla.), who said the Obama administration had misused its CCC authority, said there’s nothing wrong with what Trump is doing.
                              “This set of payments applies to everybody in the country, but it is based on how trade wars have impacted your commodity group,” Lucas said, noting that the payments vary between crops. “There might have been some question back in 2011 that perhaps the language skewed to benefit a particular part of the country.”
                              House Agriculture Committee Chair Collin Peterson (D-Minn.) rejected the idea that he had done Trump a favor.
                              “I’m doing my farmers a favor, that’s what I’m doing,” Peterson told HuffPost. “I’m not worried about anything else. They need the money.”



                              Last edited by davidm479; 09-19-2019, 09:52 PM.

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                              • There aren't enough farm votes worth worrying about. So I don't buy the theory it's about votes.
                                And it's fine that everyone *****es about the tariffs but ask yourself honestly, what would prices be had their been no tariffs but still the overproduction we have plus the drop in demand because of dead pigs.
                                I'm not saying tariffs haven't hurt.
                                But face it. There's a segment of the population that wakes up every morning pizzed off at trump and looking for something else to blame him for.
                                The honest truth of the matter?
                                Probably lies somewhere in between.

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