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  • #61
    Me either....till this week.

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    • #62
      Originally posted by IN555 View Post
      So you are saying the guacamole exporters purchase Mexico's imported grains? Or potash export companies in Canada purchase their imported grain? I had no idea Honda bought all of Japan's imported US grains either, interesting. And I suppose all of the trade balances on these exchanges are exactly identical then??? Wow that is amazing
      Really? You think that was the point I was making? Ok then....

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      • #63
        Originally posted by Freedom farmer View Post
        Oh, I get it Grainbelt2, if the Russian ruble were to become ALMOST worthless, they could still buy all the corn that they wanted. They could use ALMOST worthless ruble to buy pesos or yen and then buy our corn.

        Never once said they could buy all the corn they wanted with a strong or a weak ruble. Not sure where you got that. With their real asset exports (oil, gas, vodka, wheat, wives, etc) they could still afford the same quantity of imports before or after the ruble revaluation (all other things held constant).

        I think you fail to comprehend how anyone buys anything. The currency is the facilitator of the transaction, the actual purchase is an exchange of assets. If you don't have an asset to make a purchase with, you can't buy anything.

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        • #64
          So when that Canadian comes down here today to buy a cow, it will be transacted in US$, no matter how many Loonies it takes to make $2,000 US. As long as Canadians do business in Canada on Canadian crops, no big deal. When he wants a load of Wash. alfalfa, a vacation in Ariz., or shopping at Costco in Bellingham, he's paying a 20% premium/exchange.YUP, we buy whatever we can to feed the cows from them. Just don't buy their oranges.

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          • #65
            Originally posted by Grainbelt2 View Post
            Really? You think that was the point I was making? Ok then....
            My point is the same individuals aren't necessarly the ones exchanging the goods so as the currency value changes it may be a tailwind for one individual and a headwind for another.

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            • #66
              Looking at the corn trade today, reiterates the statement somebody said on here..."the market can remain irrational longer than you can remain solvent".

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              • #67
                Originally posted by IN555 View Post
                My point is the same individuals aren't necessarly the ones exchanging the goods so as the currency value changes it may be a tailwind for one individual and a headwind for another.
                I never claimed they were. Economies are dynamic and currencies have velocity.

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                • #68
                  Here is a pretty good look at today's "Markets"

                  Nothing is real. Everything is disconnected from what it is supposed to represent.

                  I am appropriating Baudrillard (four orders of the sign) for this, The Four orders of Financial Reality is what I will call it:

                  1. In the begining, accounting numbers reflected what was really true and statistics reflected a business or the economy, with a plus or minus confidence interval. The reports reflected what was true.

                  2. Some folks started stealing and needed to disguise it. The accounting numbers were sometimes true and sometimes not. Counterfeit became possible. You cannot read the numbers and be sure you know what is true anymore. The numbers can still hint at the reality of the theft when an auditor comes in and they "don't all add up." People question reality, and want to get at the truth.

                  3. Most folks in finance and business were stealing and lying otherwise they could not compete, it became "normal." Governments could not finance themselves if they told the truth. The accounting is totally unhooked from the real economy. The numbers do not reflect a truth nor point at a truth. The numbers have no realtion to reality. The truth is long ago lost.

                  4. All accounting is now pure simulation. The simulacrum has no relationship to any financial reality or the economy whatsoever. Here, the books in the system merely reflect other books and accounting and any claim to reality is only of the order of other such claims. This is a regime of total equivalency, where accounting and statistics need no longer even pretend to be real in a naïve sense, because the experiences of consumers' lives are so predominantly artificial that even claims to reality are expected to be phrased in artificial, "hyperreal" terms. We all expect them to lie because we all know it is simulation. Any naïve pretension to financial reality and a real economy as such is perceived as bereft of critical self-awareness, and thus as oversentimental. This is the Feds position. They are not counterfeiting when they print. They are the simulacra that is hiding the truth that there is no truth.

                  The Feds, The USDA, Central Banks. Nothing else matters
                  Last edited by db51; 01-13-2015, 04:17 PM.

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                  • #69
                    db51, it must be strange to be you. Love the mumbo jumbo.

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                    • #70
                      well so much for trying to buy corn acres,the report would have lead one to believe that corn prices would gain on beans,but after yesterdays hugh reversal nc corn has lost about 6% whereas nc beans have lost about 4%,the nc corn bean ratio is about 2.4 which still favors beans,and with funds holding a sizeable net long position in corn ,liquidation of those longs could widen the ratio even more.technicaly this weeks action looks very bearish,a confirmation of the weekly reversals lower two weeks ago,long term this may help prices as corn acres get cut even more,not only here but also in brazil where 2nd crop corn acres could still see a big drop.but for now the path of least rest. is lower,

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                      • #71
                        also the break has been on heavy volume which makes it all the more credible.

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                        • #72
                          With all this bearish overtone and all the bs thrown about by everyone I'll make a little stab in the heart of this bear market. Weatherwise I'm noticing a little thing called lack of moisture this winter. It doesn't seem like we are getting as much as normal....so maybe a drought could be in the wings this year.....now wouldn't that change a few bears into bulls, maybe not, I'm just saying this weather seems a little suspect but maybe I'm getting ahead of myself...riding a unicorn with my mouth full of blonds aint all bad ya know.

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                          • #73
                            You might not be getting moisture, but down here we're filled to saturation point, still frozen water standing from the last 3/4" last weekend.....looks like rest of this month and February are ABOVE normal Precipitation for us. From here on out, everything goes to the Gulf of Mexico and out into the ocean....we're full..................................

                            until July. When we'll be empty. lmao

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                            • #74
                              the drought monitor map shows eastern Dakotas most of mn in drought status,if we are still dry come spring and prices still low a big cut in corn acres west cb is an extreme possibility

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                              • #75
                                We haven't had enough snow to blade off the drive yet. But still holding the same course of last year, you don't have to go very many miles east to where the moisture starts. Except for having some cover on the wheat, spring rains do the most good. I hope we get some.

                                In reference to steffy's comment about corn acres, if milo continues to hold the .75 to .85 cent premium over corn, what is that going to do to corn acres.
                                Last edited by 4450; 01-15-2015, 09:59 AM.

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