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  • #31
    I new something was amiss when mark tried to tell me the hamburger was cheaper than the helper in the "hamburger helper".

    As a 5 year running underacheiver award winner, i am well aware of the cost of the helper.

    Maybe owning livestock won't be such a bad thing.

    now if they only would let me out of my straight jacket.

    looks like i will add a little more milo to the rotation, have some ground 2 years out of alfalfa that i should still have 30 or 40 lbs of nitrogen credit for, 60 lbs of liquid next spring,, and pray the lumax keeps the grass at bay.

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    • #32
      milo is worth more per bu than corn in our area and it's a whole lot cheaper tp plant.

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      • #33
        82 takes more to rattle me Ha Ha

        What's milo compared to corn to fertilize costs ?
        More drought resistance then corn is right ?
        Chemicals ? RR Milo ?

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        • #34
          Milo is less than corn here and during harvest, elevators quit taking it even on contracted bushels during harvest and some growers had their t!t in the ringer. In a normal year, milo will be 40-100 bushels/acre less in yield than corn and there is virtually no crop insurance guarantee. You hardly ever see a field of it around here.

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          • #35
            cost's alot less to plant ,is not roundup ready ,more drought resistant,but he biggest plus,drum roll please.
            PHEASANTS LOVE IT.

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            • #36
              Pheasants...Ain't got any of those either. F(uck!

              HEY BULLISH NEWS FROM UNICORN SKITTLE SH1TTING CENTRAL.

              Cocoa Cola lays off 2,000, Caterpillar to follow suite. GOOD NEWS FOR STAWKS!

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              • #37
                we had a good crop of pheasants again last year.I haven't tallied everything yet but after our last group left we we should be close to 3,000 roosters harvested.

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                • #38
                  now back to reality,grains like cattle also seem to be rolling over,a bullish report will be needed next week to prevent more downside .You guys all know I'm usually one of the more bullish on this thread.but this cheap energies and strong US $ keeps the risk to the downside.If under sold one should look at cash or future sales ,at the very least buy some puts.

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                  • #39
                    Farmgirl Just sent you a message in here.
                    Did not realize that my inbox was full til now.

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                    • #40
                      Db your in box is full,drop me a email please. SIF ? your down there to there ?
                      [email protected]

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                      • #41
                        I must agree with Gulke, the strong dollar and likely reduced exports are a worry. Will the worry ratchet up on Monday?

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                        • #42
                          Two things here: 1, using the dollar index as your proxy for a strong dollar effecting ag export is flawed. 83+% of the dx index is made up of the Euro(57%) Yen (14%) and the GBR Pound (12%). Great Britain and the EU buy very small amount of US grain and unless the US has a drought Japan volume is basically static. 2. There is very little correlation between the relative value of the dollar to exports. Which makes perfect sense. The real value of goods exchanged has nothing to do with the relative value of the currencies involved. As long as global end users are able to process grain into finished goods at a profitable margin, they will keep buying.

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                          • #43
                            Grainbelt2, over the last year Mexico has to pay about 15% more in pesos. Canadians have to pay about 10% more. Japanese have to pay about 20% more in yen. Some can afford that, but many will be forced to buy at least a bit less. Of course some will turn to other nations to make their purchases.

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                            • #44
                              That weighted Dollar index is a cluster fxck.
                              Bottom line,,,our strong US dollar is basing what our exchange rates to our importing countries are. It makes OUR grains, MORE expensive in the world market..... Plus ocean dry freight shipping rates are still very cheap. If one does not think our dollar makes a difference think back what our farm gate prices were in the early 2000's.

                              Well I just did the "Budweiser tour", saw the Clydesdale's, quite pampered horses BTW..... BUTTTTTTT, when your done with the tour,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, all you gets is ONE nice cold fresh brewed beer. Did not this used to be all the free beer you want ? ? ?

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Freedom farmer View Post
                                Grainbelt2, over the last year Mexico has to pay about 15% more in pesos. Canadians have to pay about 10% more. Japanese have to pay about 20% more in yen. Some can afford that, but many will be forced to buy at least a bit less. Of course some will turn to other nations to make their purchases.
                                They receive 15% more in Peso's for exported guacamole, 10% more in Maple Leafs for their exported potash, and 20% more in Yen for exported Honda's. The real value of the trade is unchanged. Currency is the grease that facilitates the trade, it has nothing to do with the real exchange of goods.

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