Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Marketing 2015

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • land is starting too come loose down here a large farm co for this area threw their hands up and WALKED AWAY this week leaving 2500 all rented some with crop still on it I do not know the acreage of what as of yet this is good bottom land mostly used to grow vegetables ,that company left and sold out a few years ago this spring a lot of this ground was under water so a lot of their wheat was lost that and the extra chemicals it took to grow this crop also they did not pay so of their land lords on the wheat so word fly fast law suits filed to recover rent so other land lords file leans on rest of crop they threw hands up and walk away ?????????????---------land is thirty miles from me so not interested hard time s bring hard decisions ----------------------------------------------------dave

    Comment


    • Originally posted by 48 View Post
      jabber: I like you a lot. You are one of the most intelligent posters on AW. But, you have an obvious conflict of interest as a seed salesman. If you give your customers the best advice...which is to cash rent their ground out, you're not going to see them again. With alfalfa you could work a budget up. You could double expenses and cut the revenue in half and still make good money. It's a no brainer azz u me ing you have dairies within 150mi. But, if you tell your C/SB customers to plant alfalfa, you are going to sell them the seed one time and not see them again for 6 years.
      48, do you realize what a lot of different equipment is needed to make hay? I know farmers who quit hay, cuz replacing the swathers, balers, wagons, etc., wasn't cost effective to upgrade. 20% of what you make is usually mulch quality.and if your 1st cut gets rained on, you have a long year of heartaches.

      Comment


      • [QUOTE=jabber1;389065]
        Originally posted by 48 View Post

        I don't know your seed dealer the size of his seed agency or the size of his farm. I am just a little seed guy and a modest sized farm operator. In my case- over any modest series of years, I can simply and undeniably assure you that the primary source of net income for this family has been income from crop farming. Measured in net income per year- sometimes the seed business was not even our number 2 source of family income. All of the pieces of what we do have been important sources of income over time. My wife at one time had a good job with benefits, we have rented farmland for over 42 years, we over time have purchased some farmland (any acres with debt retired is a great boost to cash flow), we grow soybeans for seed, and of course I sell seeds to some great farm operators in this area.

        BTW, knowing your seed rep's gross commission is about as valuable as knowing his gross income from farm operations. Net income for labor after all expenses are deducted drives profitability.

        U of I and farm.doc are great sources for averages. There is a very high range in the numbers that produce those averages.

        Yep times suck due to crop prices. Nope you do not know my COP.
        Don't be so sure Jabber.

        He knew EXACTLY how many bags of corn I sold this past spring so he might just have you nailed as well.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by 48 View Post
          jabber: I like you a lot. You are one of the most intelligent posters on AW. But, you have an obvious conflict of interest as a seed salesman. If you give your customers the best advice...which is to cash rent their ground out, you're not going to see them again. With alfalfa you could work a budget up. You could double expenses and cut the revenue in half and still make good money. It's a no brainer azz u me ing you have dairies within 150mi. But, if you tell your C/SB customers to plant alfalfa, you are going to sell them the seed one time and not see them again for 6 years.
          Aye 48, the perfect world just ended....fellow planted alfalfa, was just up, and GUESS what happens in Kansas...a surprise...nasty storm, high wind, hail lots of water and the
          alfalfa is NOW a re-plant. Did you budget for replant? The seed salesman was frowning, may be getting late for a re-plant now.

          Time for a fly over to see all those speculative 4 leggers..lol

          Comment


          • Originally posted by 48 View Post
            jabber: I like you a lot. You are one of the most intelligent posters on AW. But, you have an obvious conflict of interest as a seed salesman. If you give your customers the best advice...which is to cash rent their ground out, you're not going to see them again. With alfalfa you could work a budget up. You could double expenses and cut the revenue in half and still make good money. It's a no brainer azz u me ing you have dairies within 150mi. But, if you tell your C/SB customers to plant alfalfa, you are going to sell them the seed one time and not see them again for 6 years.
            If you are plating alfalfa once every 6 years you are missing out big time on yields and quality... at least "here" so... yeah. Besides, you rotate crops. Alfalfa is best suited in a rotation with corn (which lowers your corn costs that next year from N credits) and it is best to stagger the alfalfa planting so you plant some every year. Most operators run a 3-4 year stand of alfalfa.
            [URL="http://www.facebook.com/DiederichFarm"]DiederichFarm[/URL]
            "You are only as good as your next success, not your last" Sir Jock Stirrup

            Comment


            • Alfalfa? After just dealing with one of the wettest May- June time frames in my memory, I don't know how in the heck I woulda made money in alfalfa. When I consider the rainfall, high humidity, and dew that we deal with here- I think I will let someone lots better equipped and smarter than me when it comes to growing/marketing alfalfa as a cash crop take that plunge.
              “Democracy is the worst form of government, -------------------------------except for all the others.”

              ― Winston S. Churchill

              Comment


              • You have to remember Jabber - he lives were they only get like 12 inchs of rain a year - sometimes that's for 2 years - The best way for me to make money is to wheel it out - like with 18 wheels -

                Comment


                • Originally posted by jabber1 View Post
                  Alfalfa? After just dealing with one of the wettest May- June time frames in my memory, I don't know how in the heck I woulda made money in alfalfa. When I consider the rainfall, high humidity, and dew that we deal with here- I think I will let someone lots better equipped and smarter than me when it comes to growing/marketing alfalfa as a cash crop take that plunge.

                  Yup , I agree Jabber . Seems the Alfalfa is always greener on the other side of the fence !
                  I know a handful of people around here with some top quality alfalfa that can't hardly give it away the last couple years .

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by 48 View Post
                    jabber: I like you a lot. You are one of the most intelligent posters on AW. But, you have an obvious conflict of interest as a seed salesman. If you give your customers the best advice...which is to cash rent their ground out, you're not going to see them again. With alfalfa you could work a budget up. You could double expenses and cut the revenue in half and still make good money. It's a no brainer azz u me ing you have dairies within 150mi. But, if you tell your C/SB customers to plant alfalfa, you are going to sell them the seed one time and not see them again for 6 years.
                    TU.

                    I really don't make a habit of serving as an advisor to people on when they should quit farming- who they should rent their farm to- or how much cash rent neighbors should pay for farms that they rent, As farm operators- We share lots of information but I don't serve any of the above roles unless asked. When I do, I try to do so VERY carefully . Occasionally I have some who ask about rents and I give them my opinion or most often just tell them how I would reason my way through the problem- evaluate potential risks and rewards. Not one of us has a perfect crystal ball that tells what is in store for us. Without the understanding of exact financial information of those we deal with and the perfect "crystal ball" showing what is coming (grain prices/yields/interest rates) we can only make an educated guess at some good answers to the question should I quit, should I rent out my owned farmland, and/or under what terms or conditions should I rent more farmland from others.

                    As a seed representative, friend, and neighbor to many farm operators here I have to tell you that the vast majority of my customers own very little of their farmland that they farm. Some own no farmland. Most are like me and rent most of the farmland that they farm. Just how does that work if farmers don't want to end their career? How do they quit farming their owned farmland - look for someone that will pay more cash rent than they should, actually get the cash rent checks in the agreement, actually get the farms taken care of by the new tenant, and at the same time keep their rented ground to farm under terms and conditions where they make a profit????? If they pulled it off, they of course would have less acres to pay for the fixed costs of owning machines.

                    When farm operators are ready to quit, they will quit. When they do- Many of us will not be renting our owned ground to just anyone who would sign up for the highest "guaranteed" cash rent. Why? Most of us paid for a good portion of "our daily bread" by avoiding doing business with landowners focused on extracting more rents from tenants than the tenant should or could pay. Most of us have also seen some negative results in our communities when good farm operators have to quit farming, good farms aren't cared for, when overextended farmers operate tracts of land in our area, and when landowners don't get their last cash rent checks.

                    If I observe the best in the people I have followed into this business of farming- I see much to admire. Included traits and behaviors in this admirable list would be- unselfish, hardworking, compassionate, charitable, good business/investment skills, a lack of greed, a volunteer attitude, a passion for life, a passion for family, a passion for community, and a passion for this country. Hope many can say as I at some future time exit this business and leave this world that I learned something from those who came before me.
                    Last edited by jabber1; 09-22-2015, 01:37 AM.
                    “Democracy is the worst form of government, -------------------------------except for all the others.”

                    ― Winston S. Churchill

                    Comment


                    • I went on a little drive yesterday and picked up my new to me trailer from Wilson Trailer in Sioux City. Thought I would see more harvesting going on. I only saw one combine running and he was going down the road, kind of disappointing.

                      Crops looked pretty much like they do around here, some good, some not so good, seems to be quite a bit of variability. I can see why some people are saying record yield for them and others are saying not so much. I'm not sure that equates into a record average yield for MN and IA. Soybeans appeared to be better looking to me on average than corn. It looks like this next week quite a few soybeans will get wheels under them, weather permitting of course.

                      Comment


                      • Jabber - the true here is that the commission is very poor on selling alfalfa - the corn and bean sells is where the BIG bucks are at - lmao Good try thou !!!!!

                        Comment


                        • The early beans starting coming out hard this past week - a lot off the gravel type ground - with a few high ground beans coming off - there's a 4 to 5 wait at Bunge to dump - Very little corn shelled around here - many the next week - things will go nuts .

                          Comment


                          • We started running beans yesterday. Light shower knocked us out til today. Not many guys going yet. If beans werent ready, we would be shelling. But we will shell anything under 30%.

                            Oh, and we will turn a profit on every acre we farm. Put the ganja down, 48.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by ECI View Post
                              Jabber - the true here is that the commission is very poor on selling alfalfa - the corn and bean sells is where the BIG bucks are at - lmao Good try thou !!!!!
                              You seem to have me wrong. I just think someone besides me should be planting more alfalfa and less corn/soy.

                              I think you, natty, and db51 would be great candidates to have at least 25% of your acres in alfalfa every year until 48 suggests that you change.

                              BTW- 3 to 4 inches here late last week. Lots of soy ready when the ground gets fit for soy.
                              “Democracy is the worst form of government, -------------------------------except for all the others.”

                              ― Winston S. Churchill

                              Comment


                              • jabber: You said: "BTW- 3 to 4 inches here late last week. Lots of soy ready when the ground gets fit for soy."

                                Around here after the mid of Sep, it turns cool. This year was 2 days late. 9-15=100, and 9-16=98. NOW, it has cooled off. If we got 3-4" of rain right now, all the pods would be popping before you could think about getting a flex head or flex draper into the field. This happened years ago, and the pods started popping. Everybody panic ed and used JD Row Crop heads...rutted their fields up...ANNNNDDD...guess what a RC head does to SB's that are shattering to start off with. There's a reason why we do continuous irrigated corn on corn here despite all the advantages of a SB/C rotation. With C you can wait til the ground freezes up. And, there's no drying cost. We call it freeze dried corn.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X