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iron prices for POS IHs

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  • iron prices for POS IHs

    They couldn't keep'm running, so patched and painted?




    https://www.agweb.com/blog/machinery...ansas-auction/

  • #2
    got to remember Dennis nothing burns like a deere,so there is zip to sell LMAO!

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    • #3
      I do believe there are more JD tractors still being used from that era than there are Case IH tractors.
      “Democracy is the worst form of government, -------------------------------except for all the others.”

      ― Winston S. Churchill

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      • #4
        That may be true. However, I suspect the reason is not a longer life product. Here if it was red it was turned up, way up. Lots of 1066's pushing 180hp and no pyrometer. Lots of them turning 3,000 rpm too. I was around a lot of 12's that would bring the front end off the ground with a full rack on the front just by pulling the throttle down in high 3rd or 4th. Very few green ones were turned up. Most green guys were afraid to pull that little stop out on the throttle to get that last few rpm.
        I was also around a lot of red tractors that the owners never bought grease and only added oil when the light came on!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by iadave View Post
          That may be true. However, I suspect the reason is not a longer life product. Here if it was red it was turned up, way up. Lots of 1066's pushing 180hp and no pyrometer. Lots of them turning 3,000 rpm too. I was around a lot of 12's that would bring the front end off the ground with a full rack on the front just by pulling the throttle down in high 3rd or 4th. Very few green ones were turned up. Most green guys were afraid to pull that little stop out on the throttle to get that last few rpm.
          I was also around a lot of red tractors that the owners never bought grease and only added oil when the light came on!
          Sounds like the typical IH owner you are describing was just a bit more conservative version of the the tractor puller we talked to years ago.
          Set up a tractor up to pull a 10 bottom plow, 10 MPH, for 10 seconds. Yup, it will do a lot in a little bit of time for a bit of time and then it blows up.
          “Democracy is the worst form of government, -------------------------------except for all the others.”

          ― Winston S. Churchill

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          • #6
            There are lots of Deere's around here that were turned up. Guys that didn't go over board and only went 20 hp and no problem. I'm still running tractors that were turned up. 4320, 4440, 4640 all putting out a little more than the average girl on a Friday night.

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            • #7
              Knew 2 brothers in school who were mechanical geniuses . Their dad had a new 76 JD 4430 . Those 2 new exactly how much to turn it up , and exactly where to weight it and how much . They would pull that tractor in 3-4 weight classes and win them all . Some got wizzed off , so they finally put in a new rule that the top 3 places had to hook to a dyno and they could only be a certain % over the manufactured HP rating .
              And yes , that tractor is still running strong !

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              • #8
                Couldn't hardly keep rear ends in a 4430 that was stock. Popular tractor when they came out but had it's shortcoming. And just wondering what the average girl on a Friday night was putting out up there in the north df, lol,

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 4450 View Post
                  Couldn't hardly keep rear ends in a 4430 that was stock. Popular tractor when they came out but had it's shortcoming. And just wondering what the average girl on a Friday night was putting out up there in the north df, lol,

                  LMAO 4450, NEITHER of us will catch up even if it is a good number df comes up with...




                  how 1/8 inch increase in axle size took many of the 30 series problems away, size matter, hitch pins etc...

                  lol

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                  • #10
                    When in read , how 1/8 inch increase in axle size took many of the 30 series problems away, size matter, hitch pins etc...
                    I thought you said ANKLE size increasing an 1/8 in in reference to df's post
                    Don't get tripped by what's behind you

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                    • #11
                      We had 8630, what a POS. It just was. Ours was never worked real hard either. I'm guessing there is about an equal number 70's early 80's red tractors still working around here as green...there might even be a few more red tractors working yet.

                      30 series Deere tractors have a very poor reputation around here. Weak rear ends, no torque motors that didn't last, and used ALOT of fuel. The 40 series weren't much better, they might even have worse fuel consumption. I personally never liked the "legendary" sound guard cab. There was no room to carry a lunch box in the cab easily...but then you had run home for fuel before noon so you could just eat lunch in the house. Case had a waaaaay better cab than any manufacturer did back then. That's right, there are a fair amount of Case tractors still working everyday around here yet.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 82 View Post
                        We had 8630, what a POS. It just was. Ours was never worked real hard either. I'm guessing there is about an equal number 70's early 80's red tractors still working around here as green...there might even be a few more red tractors working yet.

                        30 series Deere tractors have a very poor reputation around here. Weak rear ends, no torque motors that didn't last, and used ALOT of fuel. The 40 series weren't much better, they might even have worse fuel consumption. I personally never liked the "legendary" sound guard cab. There was no room to carry a lunch box in the cab easily...but then you had run home for fuel before noon so you could just eat lunch in the house. Case had a waaaaay better cab than any manufacturer did back then. That's right, there are a fair amount of Case tractors still working everyday around here yet.

                        That coming from a guy who has been spending WAAAAAYYY to much time in the hot Florida sun ! LMAO

                        I have a friend ,neighbor , who is always giving me chit about how much fuel my 4440 uses compared to his " POS sad Case " . My comment back to him is , of course my tractor burns more fuel , its out in the field working , not sitting broke down in the shop . I'd rather pay a little more for fuel than the repair bills . His seems to have a good engine , but power shift trans problems and hydraulic issues .
                        I guess there is good and bad in them all . A lot of time the dealer service , or lack of it , is what makes the sale .

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                        • #13
                          Wonder why Magnums faded? Out under the hot sun working.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MarcoAtlarge View Post
                            Wonder why Magnums faded? Out under the hot sun working.
                            or....

                            NOT enough shade trees!


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                            • #15
                              One thing I will say about the 8630 is that it had a good clutch. The hydraulics were so slow you had stop every turn...twice with the planter and side dress tool to raise and lower the implements. You had to have the motor turning at least 2500 rpm before it paid to even try let the clutch out because the no torque motor(even with all the 50 series updates)wouldn't even try to move the machine forward. Dad used to call it "doing burnouts with the clutch". I think it had close to 10,000 hours...and probably that many hours working on it when we finally tired of the beast and sent it to Worthington. The clutch had never been worked on.

                              It died right in the middle of knee high corn when I was side dressing in a cloud of main bearing smoke...again. We managed to pull it to a field approach next to our driveway without doing a whole lot of crop damage We got to look at it everyday one whole summer before Worthington finally had time to pick it up. My daughter was just talking pretty good at the time and she used to include it in her bedtime prayers. I didn't have the heart to tell her it had already went to tractor heaven.

                              The frames were so weak in those tractors they caused the engine block to "flex". We helicoiled all the threaded motor mount holes in the block twice because the flexing would eventually eat the threads out and the motor mount bolts would fall out. That was one MFer of job. I even had to helicoil the water pump bolt holes, for some reason they even stripped out.

                              Don't even get me started on the front end. Spun bull gears, axle bearing, and axle "updates". The main problem there was the front end didn't hold enough oil. We changed it at least twice a year. Synthetic gear lube didn't get quite as black and burnt smelling after 100 hours.

                              Granite City Iron Works use to be our go to cast welders, and machinists for John Deere castings...they could weld together 8630 front ends, and 7720 finals and make them better than new even if you couldn't find all the pieces after they exploded. 7720 finals didn't really care for straddle duals or 30.5 x 32 rice and cane tires. Putting in 8820 planetary finals, transmission, and a narrowed 8820 front axle solved the 7720 final issues...geez we used to be ambitious.

                              Thinking back I guess that 8630 and the 7720's did provide job security for Frank and I during the winter months. If it wasn't for that tractor and those two combines we would have been laid off in early January after we changed oil in the Versi, 1370's and 186's.

                              About the time we would start to despair over the mountain of work sitting in a shop that was two sizes too small for the projects we were doing, an older part time farm helper/philosopher would show up for morning coffee and say..."just think of the stories you'll be able to tell when you're in the nursing home". I sure miss him.

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