Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Dairy swimming up chitt creek

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Dairy swimming up chitt creek

    Imagine for a moment that a convoy of 740 farm manure tankers simultaneously tipped over, and each truck dumped its entire load of 5,000 gallons of manure into the Wisconsin River. In the ensuing gush of waste, a tidal wave larger than six Olympic-size swimming pools, would contaminate this cherished natural resource.

    The mind reels at the level of outcry that would ensue. Environmental activists and lobbyists — ranging from the Sierra Club to Midwest Environmental Advocates — would decry the calamity, and media from across the state would race to the location, issuing hourly updates online under banners exclaiming, “Wisconsin’s Environmental Disaster: Day 1, Day 2, etc. etc. etc. ad infinitum …”

    We KNOW this would happen because, over the past decade, each time a single manure spill released a few hundred gallons on a vacant farm field or ditch, headlines have actually used words, such as “crisis” or “fish kill,” while reporters scrambled for interviews with any vacation-home owner willing to condemn the latest affront to rural property owners.


    Which brings us now to reality: On Jan. 23, a mind-numbing 3.7 MILLION gallons of raw human sewage poured into the Wisconsin River (roughly the size and amount noted at the start of this column) as a result of a pipe blockage in the Wausau area. Let’s be perfectly clear about this: A devil’s brew of untreated human feces, drug residues and other bodily wastes flushed directly into one of the state’s cherished rivers.

    Here’s what happened next:

    One week after the incident, a local TV channel ran a 6-sentence story, noting that sewage “leaked” into the river. The next day, the local paper picked up the story, also used the word “leaked” in its headline, and did its competitor one better by running a 7-sentence story.
    Not one environmental “advocate” was interviewed by either news agency. In fact, the only person quoted was Public Works Director Eric Lindman who recommended that (and I quote directly here) “any fish caught be washed and cooked thoroughly.”
    Not only did powerful organizations, such as the Sierra Club, remain silent, but locally active “environmental factions,” such as Saratoga Concerned and Kewaunee Cares, sat on their hands.
    Neither of the two largest newspapers in the state — the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and the Wisconsin State Journal — reported the story.

    It is an increasingly frustrating exercise to be a farmer in Wisconsin, made even more demoralizing by seeing the double standard applied by today’s so-called journalists and environmentalists. The slightest agricultural mishap, which might release just tens of gallons of cow manure, can lead to media backlash and/or public outcry; and, God forbid, you operate a farm that is classified as a CAFO, and have such an incident. As American consumers have grown detached from the realities of food production, so has any benefit of the doubt. The same standards clearly do not apply in urban or suburban settings.

    I am proud of spending four decades — my entire life, really — in agriculture. Despite the long hours, hard labor and sometimes unforgiving nature of the work, I have always taken great pride in the inherent nobility that comes from bringing food from our land and livestock.

    Wisconsin farmers are accustomed to working with an indifferent press corps. I fear now we are at the mercy of one that is openly antagonistic.

    Bill Eberle has spent his entire adult life in the dairy industry managing the operations of some of Wisconsin’s largest dairies. Today he works as an industry consultant specializing in dairy nutrition and labor management

    RELATED: 3.7 million gallons of sewage leaked into Wisconsin River due to plugged pipe

  • #2
    Seattle swamped a big sewer plant a coupla years ago, and dumped raw sewage into the bay for days, at over a million gallons/hour!! The big problem to me was the fact that they have a pipe extending a quarter of a mile out into the bay. That is part of their design!! These plants are all "permitted" to pollute, but you are not. Their s h I t doesn't stink. Victoria, British Columbia's capital, which is on Vancouver Island, doesn't even have a sewer system...they claim the ocean currents are so turbulent going thru the Straits of Juan de Fuga they don't need one!! Your spraying of pesticides is the same way; there are streams in our urban areas that have no ag in them, that are unable to sustain fish, and 2-4-d and Roundup are biggies in there.When you buy it by the quart at Home Depot, it adds up.

    Comment


    • #3
      Its the 21st of April No liquid manure is spread and what solid manure was spread over winter will be moving downstream. Once again Farmers will face the wrath of fishermen and boaters.I spent some time yesterday visiting with a fellow dairy farmer We were chatting about how many jobs need to get done and how far behind we already are. there are not enough manure handlers to get the work done and still grow a good crop. Roads are still posted and will be for some time yet. At this point, we can't even pull a corn planter down most roads. When the weather starts cooperating chitt will be hitting the fan.

      We also talked about all the barns that suffered severe barn damage in the Green Bay area from that 2 foot plus of heavy wet snow. Many recent built free stall barns have collapsed . As if farmers don't have enuff grief already. It makes the idea of quitting this rat race and taking up recreational fishing. But hell, even the fish are gone.

      Thanx farmers [SARCASM]

      Comment


      • #4
        Percy here..[wifeys laptop is too convenient right now]; We are not allowed to spread anything on frozen ground, and when we do spread solids off season, it needs to be on a sod, and its runoff will be monitored. Our water is tested, planes are flying over, satellites are taking pictures, manure cops are part of the people you talk to 'in the other pickup'.We are not early, but we are always behind! Too many big dairies have to find land too far from home to make it practical to haul, especially to use it to raise corn. As far as all those barns collapsing? My guess would trace it back to just barely making code, but doing it with #2 and better lumber,[ what a pile of crap], and inferior quality fasteners. i.e., I'm missing some metal, and discovered that the screws were not all galvanized...some were just painted silver. Those rusted off, and even though the good ones held, the metal ripped off in high wind. Just another way to spell "China"!!

        Comment


        • #5
          I know how you feel. I am not dairy but hear how my fertilizer is causing algae bloom in the gulf. Well my crops remove as much as I put on.
          Mean while I drive over the Missouri river bridge to deliver my grain and see a 2 ft pipe running full of raw sewage every day of the week. It has ran that way for years.
          The Corp of engineers dumps millions of tons of dredge dirt in the river making places for fish to spawn , even though those fish have lived in the river for years just fine the way it was.
          However that little bit of dirt coming off my drainage ditch is causing huge problems and must be stopped. However I must get permission from several federal agencies to do so. To make one agency happy puts me in violation of another's rules.
          It appears the government is out to stop any one who is trying to produce a product or any thing of value. The only things the government approves of encourage non productive people.

          Comment


          • #6
            I doubt if the quality of the lumber was a factor Percy. Good Washington grade A lumber.
            Actually most barns use laminates for extra strength But these barns are often built with the holding areas attached to the freestall barn. Where the roofs meet there are not enough supports and the valley where the metal meets holds the snow. The amount of snow and the wetness of the snow and the strong winds caused the snow to pile very deep on the buildings. The building are mostly fairly new . the snow load was just to much. Its like building bridges where we need to build a bridge bis enuff to handle a thousand year rain event. you can only afford so much protection. Even the crime syndicates have limits

            Too bad our government doesn't. rules are made by unproductive people who want to limit productivity and profits

            Comment


            • #7
              Trump says he got rid of all those rules. You should be in "tall clover" for a year and a half already.Just sit back , count your money and enjoy the good life. Unless he was lying ?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Kinghere View Post
                I doubt if the quality of the lumber was a factor Percy. Good Washington grade A lumber.
                Actually most barns use laminates for extra strength But these barns are often built with the holding areas attached to the freestall barn. Where the roofs meet there are not enough supports and the valley where the metal meets holds the snow. The amount of snow and the wetness of the snow and the strong winds caused the snow to pile very deep on the buildings. The building are mostly fairly new . the snow load was just to much. Its like building bridges where we need to build a bridge bis enuff to handle a thousand year rain event. you can only afford so much protection. Even the crime syndicates have limits

                Too bad our government doesn't. rules are made by unproductive people who want to limit productivity and profits
                Now we aren't there, but how are these boys fastening those grade A rafters to treated poles/posts? Whenever possible, don't use the treated poles, cuz they're made out of hemlock, a softer wood that accepts more treatment 'juice' than fir. The only way to attach rafters to treated posts? drill thru them and put a bolt all the way thru them; lag bolts are not the same. A coupla twists and nails will back out and bend, and down she comes. Now I saw a pic of a barn east of you where every other rafter had the purlins/tin missing. That's another story, but shoddy workmanship comes to mind...they nailed the purlins well on the set of rafters assembled on the ground, not on the fill-in purlins up in the air.

                Comment


                • #9
                  In Minnesota, our Governor Mark Dayton last year implemented a buffer law, where by if you have a drainage ditch going thru your land
                  you are required to establish a vegetative buffer ranging from sixteen and one half feet to up to 50 feet, depending on the type and size
                  of water flow you have. Why did he enact this law? I believe it was more so to establish a legacy of his governorship his past two terms , then
                  it was to protect any water. Most drainage ditches dug back in the 50's and 60's dumped the spoil from the ditch on the banks, where they were
                  leveled, creating a berm next to the ditch. In most cases water would have to flow uphill over these berms to contaminate the water. Governor Dayton
                  was more concerned with pacifying the pheasant kissers and tree huggers in our state, then looking after the farmer. Then to top it off a couple weeks
                  ago, the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources proposed a option for assessing penalties for landowners not compliant with the buffer
                  requirements. They penalties they suggested were up to $500.00 per linear foot of violation. They have recently back pedaled and recinded this
                  penalty plan. We are still required to comply with the buffer law by Nov 1st, 2018. For most of this there is no compensation. Some buffers put in
                  earlier qualified for the C.R.P. program. Most buffers now do not. I guess if you are a farmer in Minnesota, no confiscation without compensation
                  does not apply.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Chore - There is no compensation because YOU don't own the banks of the river. I'm not positive if it is ownership or easement but control of the 16 1/2 to 50 feet belongs to the "Public". They are looking out for the Public good on the land they own. You had a good run growing crops to the rivers edge but the Gov. has decided they needed to do a better job of managing their lands for lower pollution and dead zone down stream. Just wanted to share that before you started an anti-gov. march and end up with a rent bill for all the years you used that land for free.
                    Last edited by RON11; 04-23-2018, 10:38 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      When my brothers and I were building our heifer/calving barn last fall I made damn sure it would not come down because of snow load. I used old telephone poles on the south side which are 16' apart and open to the south. I made sure the headers were on the front and back of the posts so there would be header support not only on the end of the trusses but also 6" in from the end. I made sure the headers were let into a ledge cut into the posts.I also made sure we notched the sides of the posts to let in the trusses. The trusses and headers that land over posts all have telephone pole material under and aside of them. Took more time and effort than the guys wanted to put in but I never worried for a second when heavy snow was piling on .

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RON11 View Post
                        When my brothers and I were building our heifer/calving barn last fall I made damn sure it would not come down because of snow load. I used old telephone poles on the south side which are 16' apart and open to the south. I made sure the headers were on the front and back of the posts so there would be header support not only on the end of the trusses but also 6" in from the end. I made sure the headers were let into a ledge cut into the posts.I also made sure we notched the sides of the posts to let in the trusses. The trusses and headers that land over posts all have telephone pole material under and aside of them. Took more time and effort than the guys wanted to put in but I never worried for a second when heavy snow was piling on .
                        Way to go, RON!
                        The 1st thing to remember...collapse is NOT covered under normal insurance. If you live in our country where ALL snow is heavy, and 80mph winds can occur at the same time, certain things "happen". Most of the messes that happened would have been prevented for less than $5,000 increase in building cost if done at construction time. Too many of us have adopted the Mexican Motto...faster is always better.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Ron, It is not a river, it is a county ditch. I own the land the ditch is on, the county got an easement to dig the ditch. The easement is only for
                          the ditch, not any of the adjoining land next to the ditch. Re-read my post. Unless you can get water to run uphill, there is no pollution to the
                          ditch, because the spoil from digging the ditch serves as a berm to prevent water from running into the ditch. The governor, like you said has
                          decided they needed to do a better job of managing MY LAND, not their land. And I still argue he is doing it more so to enhance his legacy as
                          a governor then to lower pollution. If the intent was to lower pollution, why isn't the buffer law applicable to our ten thousand Minnesota lakes.
                          How much
                          pollution do you suppose comes from over fertilized lawns next to Minnesota Lakes? By the way, I cleared the ownership - easement question of the ditch
                          with my township assessor.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Buffer law in mn is the most aggressive attack on personal property rights ever. Landowner pays property taxes on property he can't use because of state mandates. Protecting the river that flows through our land is two buffer strips one on each side of the river. Because of natural flow of river both buffer strips are higher in elevation than the farm fields next to them when it floods the buffers are the last to go under water.
                            Don't get tripped by what's behind you

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by PERCY View Post
                              Now we aren't there, but how are these boys fastening those grade A rafters to treated poles/posts? Whenever possible, don't use the treated poles, cuz they're made out of hemlock, a softer wood that accepts more treatment 'juice' than fir. The only way to attach rafters to treated posts? drill thru them and put a bolt all the way thru them; lag bolts are not the same. A coupla twists and nails will back out and bend, and down she comes. Now I saw a pic of a barn east of you where every other rafter had the purlins/tin missing. That's another story, but shoddy workmanship comes to mind...they nailed the purlins well on the set of rafters assembled on the ground, not on the fill-in purlins up in the air.
                              Percy , Sometimes Good Ol ma Nature just gives you some sort of crap weather that even proper and well built buildings can't withstand . Having cleaned up Hurricane areas , Tornado , and Major Ice storm damage , I wonder at what cost are we supposed to build buildings to withstand all that the weather can throw at us ? Can farmers and businesses really afford complete weather proof buildings ?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X