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Kansas wheat tour 2019

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  • #16
    What you post steffy makes it look like seed salespeople are writing the rules...I do NOT know the rules, but would definitely be "thunk'n" some sort of a blend for cover, that might develop
    into something grazeable or mechanical harvest if it is livestock in mind.

    wondering what type of seed tubes it takes to allow an 80,000 seed count with corn... lol

    Comment


    • #17
      How do we know that the 80,000 seeds/acre is correct? $150 seed cost? Of course you could get cheap seed, blend conventional and RR, then spray with Round up to kill the majority of them. Now is the time for ole 48 and his cochia sermon!!

      Comment


      • #18
        Just because it came out of a bag that said it was conventional corn does not mean round up will kill it.
        I was thinking plant in 15 inch rows may be good if using corn for a cover.

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        • #19
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          FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

          June 30, 2019
          Contact: Marsha Boswell, [email][email protected][/email] (wlmailhtml:%7BC704D5B9-E012-46E9-AF1F-EE24945CFEFB%7Dmid://00000038/!x-usc:mailto:[email protected])



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          Day 3, Kansas Wheat Harvest Report[/TD]
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          For audio file, please visit kansaswheat.org. (wlmailhtml:%7BC704D5B9-E012-46E9-AF1F-EE24945CFEFB%7Dmid://00000038/!x-usc:[url]http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001D4_7K05UdlH-Ew4SdWLeIL2Z6WfmLZUZe_szqKe564tiGkCjfxPZVcO4AQGDip-Sv6tiR6tIBOGz7UV39SFYG_T1Y7sxcXRjjXrlAaqNUN2c7BnSD m9DQqLXsY21GFWMRgoulyIFPc90iCiLABHMcfFA4eS3169do8I 860ZIyvl_1nKvRWPSaQ==&c=TQN7gLaCnH72zTp2qoRhb9DOs0 Wid5saytKZ8E5FYl5LQQr9WGPyYA==&ch=7HDPWqSf_Dnsds7-bE9O4yisY1_tcu6mJmElbB9yDkr0ADCrnXTZLg==[/url])



          This is day 3 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.
          Harvest picked up momentum and began to move quickly over the weekend. It has reached many areas across the southern and central parts of the state. With the exception of the northwest, most areas are mature, and only the wet ground is keeping some farmers from the fields.
          Doug Keesling, a farmer near Chase, reported that his harvest began on Wednesday. The soil in his area is sandy, so they have been trying to avoid the wet areas, but that's hard this year. They have already received 25 inches of rain since the beginning of January, and their annual rainfall usually averages 24-26 inches. They don't have a lot of mud holes, but they found one Sunday and got a combine stuck.
          Their fields are yielding in the mid to upper 60 bushels per acre, which is about average. It's still early in his harvest, which will last a total of about two weeks. Test weights have averaged mostly 58-60, with proteins ranging from 11 to 11.5.
          John Hildebrand, a farmer near Stafford, reported that harvest really got started on Thursday, an especially late start for the area. While many acres are ready to cut, he said there is still a decent chunk of acres covered in mud holes and some fields that are too green to harvest. Yields in the area are highly variable, but he estimates that many fields will fall in the 40-70 bushels per acre range. He thinks harvest will be in full swing for another week, providing they continue to have good weather.
          Test weights have held up well for Hildebrand, with every truckload he has taken in above 60 pounds per bushel. The one load he has received a protein analysis on came back at 10.8 percent. His fields have also missed several hail events that have severely impacted yields in neighboring communities. He is also dealing with some lodging issues.
          "We have been really fortunate to be having yields this good despite bad weather during the growing season and spotty looking stands," Hildebrand said. "We've still got several nice looking fields left to go. We have gotten lucky this year, even with the late start."
          Gary Millershaski, who farms in Kearney County, started his harvest on Friday. He reports that his test weights are up to 65.
          "We've been very pleasantly surprised with above average yields, heavy test weights and good quality grain," Millershaski said. He said the yields depend on the variety, but an average yield in his area is 35 to 40 bushels per acre, and his fields have been producing better than that. He said proteins in the area range from 9 to 11.5%. His local elevator, which just added storage capacity, says they're going to start hauling out on Monday. "I'm afraid we're going to have storage concerns in the area," he said.
          The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

















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          • #20
            sorry for all the wasted space, looks good before posting...

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            • #21
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              FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

              July 1, 2019
              Contact: Marsha Boswell, [email][email protected][/email] (wlmailhtml:%7BC704D5B9-E012-46E9-AF1F-EE24945CFEFB%7Dmid://00000587/!x-usc:mailto:[email protected])



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              Day 4, Kansas Wheat Harvest Report[/TD]
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              For audio file, please visit kansaswheat.org. (wlmailhtml:%7BC704D5B9-E012-46E9-AF1F-EE24945CFEFB%7Dmid://00000587/!x-usc:[url]http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001WPUGVjeMauaYjZUb8Y3xjUmXYoMpWoJUK5vNgT I5oosuFz2kXslX74IFRJOWwDqkZwELsxudPVw-__qAsshqe0V2hb-Rq0Cm5XZtxb6mcS_fvPU6_sPMyNXYFm-YGe_poPaHFJQ2uf-w-LwwRMB9XyZDX7ISBlyT2AsWN5BeR5AOCmW8r07-Y3gkN_bwpcH0erTpmU6KB9L_Eu8GrVwU3IXdhoYj-m6QbDFycUCDR-hCaSUN_vx1fw==&c=-AzeqCifrYz3na-WsE3OlvAVUPU-ZriMFD0fJzwyww1RKDn_Iu5rcw==&ch=zqQhvQLoC8uHN_k7Dg uF6ewMbCG_EtjMLFwB9RoaU5KwZnU0ELvsPQ==[/url])



              This is day 4 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.
              According to the USDA/NASS crop progress and condition report for the week ending June 30, only 28% of Kansas winter wheat has been harvested, well behind 68% last year and 61% for the five-year average. Winter wheat condition rated 4 percent very poor, 12 poor, 29 fair, 41 good and 14 excellent. Winter wheat coloring was 98 percent. Mature was 76 percent, behind 95 last year.
              Mike Schloctermeier, of Meade Coop Elevator & Supply Co., reports that since starting harvest on June 20, they have seen exceptional results.
              "Having dry weather this last week, harvest has really picked up the last 5 or 6 days," says Schloctermeier. He reported that this is some of the best wheat his guys have seen out in the field, with yields ranging from 65-80. Proteins have been all over the place, ranging from 9 to low 11, but still they are pleased with the results. While they have been running about 10 days behind normal harvest, they are still happy to be harvesting quality wheat this year.
              Lyle Friesen with Friesen Harvesting reports that they started harvesting in Oklahoma on June 4 and will continue all the way through harvest in Montana. They have seen yields of 50 to 80 bushels per acre in Kansas, where they are harvesting between Meade and Plains. Test weights have ranged from 60 to 64, and proteins are 10-12%. The area has seen 14 inches of rain since May. While he reports they are harvesting more acres this year than last year, last year was their lowest acres since they started in 1949. The varieties they are harvesting this year are Grainfield and Winterhawk, which have been performing pretty well.
              Calvin Williamson, who farms in the Ensign area, reports that his yields are averaging about 80 bushels per acre. He had one field that had hail damage, and with empty heads, it was averaging in the 30s. He reports that a field near Minneola normally yields under 30, but yielded 65 bushels per acre this year. They started harvest on June 26 and plan to be finished with their 2,200 acres by July 6. Test weights have been excellent at 63 pounds, and he reports protein is averaging 12%.
              Daren Fischer, of Golden Belt Coop Assn. Inc, in Ellis County, has been seeing the brighter days of wheat harvest this year. Their test weights are excellent, and moisture has been rather solid at 11-12. They are very pleased with the wheat they are seeing. While they did have a few acres hailed out, they are finding the silver lining of the good quality wheat that they are bringing in.
              Nicole Harrison, farmer and agronomist with Rezac Land and Livestock in Pottawatomie County, reports that the variety Zenda has been performing well for them this year. Their yields have been ranging from 40 to 60 bushels per acre, which is slightly better than average for their area, especially considering they grazed their wheat. Test weights are ranging from 58-60, and proteins have been excellent, ranging from 11.8 to 13.8%. They started wheat harvest on June 28 and are rushing to get finished so they can bale the straw and get their double crop soybeans planted before July 4.
              The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

















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              • #22
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                FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

                July 2, 2019
                Contact: Marsha Boswell, [email][email protected][/email] (wlmailhtml:%7BC704D5B9-E012-46E9-AF1F-EE24945CFEFB%7Dmid://00000641/!x-usc:mailto:[email protected])



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                Day 5, Kansas Wheat Harvest Report[/TD]
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                For audio file, please visit kansaswheat.org. (wlmailhtml:%7BC704D5B9-E012-46E9-AF1F-EE24945CFEFB%7Dmid://00000641/!x-usc:[url]http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=0017heXjeSoHG7Xyq5BY8CgV2Qz-32Ux84FBAmkscy61_8nnDQ8zzeC_IhWPVK56Y6V4fF3SUTmLJh R4KwBOmeDSAOYB5Tir4saZHeGglZ_2LG-93q0CdDC-1ItzdQGMYusxWGV3-DL2-qCGEIIMCQlh03AvQIF9OGqE0IMQvr-kp6YIXVJ04Yv-Yvd-l8MG3t7DbhC3pSILxsNrOrC6QCS5HThmWIysDo9g8rCdc10e6o F8ER1tz4QKw==&c=E3o-OFA9qvjIp__GDETx3s8IERl9tTqEmzwm7pxAO-A782oZq-bRaQ==&ch=N0sGixRUOjxh9opFMA1qYVPUNFbgkYFJks1Qt4ET FWHccl3ZVixjWA==[/url])




                By Peyton Powell, Kansas Wheat Intern



                This is day 5 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.
                It's the tale of two crops during the 2019 Kansas wheat harvest as some pockets of harvested acres are seeing above average yields and test weights while other areas are battling drowned acres, severe lodging, weed pressure and on top of it all, low yields. Combines are continuing to roll northward as some are anxious to start (while others are anxious to finish) before the Fourth of July celebrations.
                Jay Armstrong, a farmer in Muscotah, Kansas, has wrapped up his wheat harvest for the year. He ended up averaging about 60 bushels per acre. On acres that weren't flooded out his test weights came in at around 60 pounds per bushel and higher. A lot of wheat in his area had to be cut wet (thanks to Mother Nature's soggy conditions) and put in bins with giant fans blowing on the kernels to bring the moisture content down.
                Martin Kerschen, a farmer in Garden Plain, Kansas, is finishing up this year's wheat harvest. They received about 31 inches of rain in a span of 54 days. Nevertheless they were able to pull wheat harvest off. He has been seeing average yields and noticed that the sandier soil fields were harvesting better.
                "Considering everything that has happened this year, we are happy with the results," says Kerschen. Kerschen is also happy for wheat farmers out in western Kansas. He says "while that may not be my field I'm harvesting, all of us wheat farmers are in this together. It's nice for others in the industry to be successful."
                Jeff Boyd at the Garden City Coop reported their harvest started up late last week and local famers are making progress through the hot and dry days. The proteins are less than average, but their yields have been ranging between 70-80 bushels per acre with an average test weight of 63 pounds per bushel. If the weather holds up, they should have a little over a week left of harvest, so let's hope Mother Nature keeps the rain away for a while!
                The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use # wheatharvest19. (wlmailhtml:%7BC704D5B9-E012-46E9-AF1F-EE24945CFEFB%7Dmid://00000641/!x-usc:[url]http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=0017heXjeSoHG7Xyq5BY8CgV2Qz-32Ux84FBAmkscy61_8nnDQ8zzeC_EzQYEO5vwpJSHlNM1lQjVk Mo0rdzoOKpySuvl4lUTFA0F73BlSLFnCTralx8L4KTn05dTCMk dkxC352wCCQwJnP93jPJLIg1580tXDZRJypR4XcVvimoCIxmfQ WLLRlGSwzB7dfM4vEPczCCOazAx4nSLtxxtB2WxItNxCaVaAc9 s7BueX-PVXKZrX2S48c0t06VLWBZKjLTTxiZ7DzprF3RPi0wCyc1A==&c =E3o-OFA9qvjIp__GDETx3s8IERl9tTqEmzwm7pxAO-A782oZq-bRaQ==&ch=N0sGixRUOjxh9opFMA1qYVPUNFbgkYFJks1Qt4ET FWHccl3ZVixjWA==[/url])


















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                • #23

                  July 3, 2019
                  Contact: Marsha Boswell, [email][email protected][/email] (wlmailhtml:%7BC704D5B9-E012-46E9-AF1F-EE24945CFEFB%7Dmid://00000492/!x-usc:mailto:[email protected])



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                  Day 6, Kansas Wheat Harvest Report[/TD]
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                  For audio file, please visit kansaswheat.org. (wlmailhtml:%7BC704D5B9-E012-46E9-AF1F-EE24945CFEFB%7Dmid://00000492/!x-usc:[url]http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001SskkV76FTM7Bhv78oOLj-bamqty5-HHltxWM93BP9eZRVBBLTb_0ujMiwNjaYwxqb_2Ec95whruo25r b6UatbR3JAv2ETwK_PThqYHOzIzJHDxV0VqgMDdbMzz27liqlE IFk1cP796-e7-X4x3PVRP9XQ4BdahcNs7Kg_6N8RD53QbFq0ZUjQjxQzRInV8is u0SAzU-Oi64R96HaNUlrFM1W4W3Jpy5g-B_4YjzS1KdkPuBvB8I5tw==&c=UdcKYFk7Be9gm7P5qOxjaOqn A6LxQe4pOqvDnNrKuily6O-4lAI_fg==&ch=DC7XKuUxn9of1CFLl-AvTm48Rnv1k_kTJu5kz7OXF3ZbJKSMjykYnw==[/url]) In observance of the Fourth of July, Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports will resume on June 7th, weather permitting.




                  By Peyton Powell, Kansas Wheat Intern



                  This is day 6 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. Harvest Reports will resume on July 7th, weather permitting.
                  Wheat harvest continues to slowly work northward in Kansas as farmers are racing against Mother Nature while needing to crawl slowly through the remaining fields due to green stems (but ripe heads.) Isolated storms did flare up on Wednesday, but limited rainfall didn't delay harvest substantially. There are more scattered storms in the forecast again over the weekend and harvest might slow down if the weather pattern shifts back to rains.
                  Bob Temple, of WindRiver Grain in Garden City, reported that his area is usually wrapping up harvest around this time, but they are running a little behind schedule due to the rain they received this year. On the bright side - they are seeing above average yields and hope to finish harvest closer to the end of next week. Their protein levels have been below average.
                  Morgan Walls, of Elkhart Coop, is running about two weeks behind in wheat harvest this year. Their protein levels are averaging about 10.5-11 percent and test weights are ranging from 60-64 pounds per bushel. They are seeing above average yields, having 40-60 bushels per acre instead of 20-25 per acre. He is hoping to finish harvest out within the next two weeks.
                  Justin Ochs, Skyland Grain in Johnson, also reported a two week delay behind a normal harvesting schedule. Ochs said that they may be looking at a 70 bushels per acre average for harvest, but he also pointed out that many farmers in their territory had been 'hammered by hail', so that number could have been higher. Test weights are in the mid-60s, but proteins are lower than average (with the exception of a pocket from Eastern Colorado that is right at 12 percent.) He estimates that the area will be cutting for another ten days, depending on if the weather cooperates.

                  The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use # wheatharvest19. (wlmailhtml:%7BC704D5B9-E012-46E9-AF1F-EE24945CFEFB%7Dmid://00000492/!x-usc:[url]http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001SskkV76FTM7Bhv78oOLj-bamqty5-HHltxWM93BP9eZRVBBLTb_0ulqQ-W4mLb69S5m_7ejtLyKIt53fo4Iwn4o_JP4zfzLvmwenqYNCdRS Bb-681SFqirXSCp4AZnvmzMbtlDVYDU3nuC_hDlv0YaBWeRc-JM-Bf7dPqNqlkvFSjQBZpKmCMMKygcVBdTh6n0QZLhQmiaWvdaU9M jFNK7MPpBHSxw3el_HUnZl0yzp-0586bj9P1iaGu2KLAWnyozfGiAlcAJbI2TrcBW2-EQ==&c=UdcKYFk7Be9gm7P5qOxjaOqnA6LxQe4pOqvDnNrKuil y6O-4lAI_fg==&ch=DC7XKuUxn9of1CFLl-AvTm48Rnv1k_kTJu5kz7OXF3ZbJKSMjykYnw==[/url])


















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                  • #24
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                    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

                    July 7, 2019
                    Contact: Marsha Boswell, [email][email protected][/email] (wlmailhtml:%7BC704D5B9-E012-46E9-AF1F-EE24945CFEFB%7Dmid://00000223/!x-usc:mailto:[email protected])



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                    Day 7, Kansas Wheat Harvest Report[/TD]
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                    For audio file, please visit kansaswheat.org. (wlmailhtml:%7BC704D5B9-E012-46E9-AF1F-EE24945CFEFB%7Dmid://00000223/!x-usc:[url]http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001IGGj0dGrCbIjV7OZtCwPfyTjHXNhXATaMaX50l JM2hhzf_dBn0dgrDpLgA3rISNydGspv8_T24J9EgnHrJJjMBva oaTES5uyPmC7jhE5VEffFmp5p-yt5NpEvUqVqHHAjtyZ6IjbmSqyMQLf9sqiRMcwvYINseqIS3B4 vF_FH7T12WthQTmILA==&c=xMW6gCeFfGniJcfFQi2tbUOcjXW EzQVXePPZWR65GQ1FIAdzAQTOag==&ch=N-JWeCsmAGr4011u_8qWqn-F4dg8zZV8PVdjfY_ZUb_xjbDOvmJ1NA==[/url])



                    This is day 7 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.
                    Rain continued to be hit or miss over the holiday weekend. Many Kansas wheat farmers spent their Independence Day in the wheat field. Some areas in south central Kansas have finally wrapped up their harvest, but there are still a lot of acres left to cut in the rest of the state. While some areas in northwest Kansas have begun, they have been chased out of the fields by scattered storms. Localized rainfall amounts range from zero to more than 8 inches across the state. There is still green wheat in some areas as well.
                    Josh Debes, who farms near Hoisington, reported that, "with all things considered, late planting, hail damage and weed pressure, we're pretty happy with this year's crop."
                    While yields are lower than the last couple years, they are in line with the 10 year average. Debes says they are down to their last 30 acres of wheat to cut, but with 2 1/2" of rain Saturday night and more expected Monday night, they won't be able to finish those up for a few more days. Harvest began June 26, which is much later than normal. Josh and his wife Julia returned to the farm five years ago, and this is the first time they have even cut wheat in July.
                    Debes reported that test weights are holding up, with even the late planted wheat holding near 60. Even their rust resistant varieties had some rust in them this year, and there were drowned out spots and some late weed pressure. Damage from hail reduced yields in some fields. He said planting date was key; the late planted fields had yield reductions.
                    Brian Sieker, who farms near Chase, reported that it's the tail end of harvest in his area. Western Rice County is nearing completion, but he has seen plenty of acres in Barton County that are waiting to be cut. Yields are highly variable, from 25-80 bushels an acre, and test weights are holding steady at 60-63 pounds per bushel. Sieker said that the area has seen damage from hail and flooding. While he doesn't have exact numbers for his wheat, he has heard neighbors say that there are pockets of protein in the area where they have received a premium.
                    "We've had some good and bad surprises this year," Sieker said. "But it's something you just have to take in and learn from for the next year."
                    Jason Ochs, who farms near Syracuse, said harvest is going really well this year. Their only problem is that they keep bumping into wet wheat, with some still testing as high as 18% this weekend. Scattered rains and wet ground have delayed harvest. Yields are about double their normal yields in the area, averaging 60-70 bushels per acre this year. Most of the area is about half to two-thirds complete with this year's harvest. Protein is below average, and Ochs reports his protein is mostly ranging from 10-11%. Test weights for hard red winter wheat are holding up at 60-61, and hard white wheat is even higher at 63+.


                    The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use # wheatharvest19. (wlmailhtml:%7BC704D5B9-E012-46E9-AF1F-EE24945CFEFB%7Dmid://00000223/!x-usc:[url]http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001IGGj0dGrCbIjV7OZtCwPfyTjHXNhXATaMaX50l JM2hhzf_dBn0dgrIFVDTOLsFx8cyelLzqFpDW7-QjVG8F5AB7OtwxKWrjU9SwAt0sUwpw3jXf6wm8k6As4_OCrMMB 5QK7-v4EDxFC6W8w0mxu8nFWYuxREIxaiUcWQs5oAFvulE22_g95-ka8fDMmrdqCxhnWN7ShmmpAihY93eAFD6vNZC5QmaXWVEoIG7-WItSyFtcpLkrDzSYAyBP2oBdyskmEWmPDdBHzs_ntQcYfz8A== &c=xMW6gCeFfGniJcfFQi2tbUOcjXWEzQVXePPZWR65GQ1FIAd zAQTOag==&ch=N-JWeCsmAGr4011u_8qWqn-F4dg8zZV8PVdjfY_ZUb_xjbDOvmJ1NA==[/url])


















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                    • #25
                      hey Den Den start condensing your reports down post it up then --edit-- and take all that gibberish out and it makes it easer to read --just a thought other than that trudge on --------------------------------------------dave

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                      • #26
                        tell me how to do that dave.. lol [TABLE="class: TemplateWidth, border: 0, cellpadding: 1, cellspacing: 0, width: 600"]
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                        FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

                        July 8, 2019
                        Contact: Marsha Boswell, [email][email protected][/email] (wlmailhtml:%7BC704D5B9-E012-46E9-AF1F-EE24945CFEFB%7Dmid://00000565/!x-usc:mailto:[email protected])



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                        Day 8, Kansas Wheat Harvest Report[/TD]
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                        For audio file, please visit kansaswheat.org. (wlmailhtml:%7BC704D5B9-E012-46E9-AF1F-EE24945CFEFB%7Dmid://00000565/!x-usc:[url]http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=0015RjxyEL_dDLAfMAw8oSOzjFwWmOu7Hm_-cgNKq5AqxwUIV6vbzbbUo28hmd-0wXPtRI96cSB5EmihS9Vx5P59XMaez_b4xPk2tOTWpnrIIw8tq KaBj6L5b_nfuBEei9dBHbbPGizmsNQan11avCBINoS6yoX0y55 uyuypNlWLb9DZR6MY6Mjz3oQ9rXgNXcXkyuk6lhnjjvlEOJzem vwjeZoKcuR8cFbv9_ujt9QfWYiZ3nEyjDz_Q==&c=DUvRXfOeL GTLM9R9vK7mL-7WJLU3zsOZxE2Kq0yrwsceFBNq7u0-iQ==&ch=eaW0pcInOs7K0wgPTQyAR59tMni0sVneKQr4oaYDvz Lmfim_FcooTQ==[/url])




                        By Peyton Powell, Kansas Wheat Communications Intern



                        This is day 8 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.
                        Scattered storms continue to be a theme for #WheatHarvest19 with farmers in the state playing "hurry up and wait." According to USDA NASS winter wheat condition in the state is rated 4 percent very poor, 11 poor, 27 fair, 42 good and 16 excellent. Winter wheat mature was 92 percent. Harvested was 61 percent, well behind 89 last year and 84 for the five-year average.
                        David Janzen, a farmer from Butler County, is trying to wrap up his harvest this year, with about 80 acres left to cut. He is hoping the rain stays away long enough for him to get done. Janzen is seeing yields that vary from field to field, but he is fairly pleased with the yields he is seeing, considering the amount of rain he has received this year.
                        "We are just thankful that we still have a crop to cut," Janzen said.
                        Ron Suppes, a farmer in Lane County, has come to a standstill with his wheat harvest as it began to rain again today. His area has had quite a few rain showers with high humidity, which is making it difficult for local farmers to get into the fields. With the wheat that they have harvested, Suppes reports consistent protein levels at 10-11.5% and above average yields.
                        Romulo Lollato, Wheat and Forages Extension Specialist with K-State Research and Extension, reported yields in south central and central Kansas have been highly variable (due to planting dates and moisture surpluses that drowned out quite a few acres), while out west, farmers are consistently seeing above average yields. Some areas in western Kansas are still seeing some green wheat because it was late getting planted. Test weights throughout the state continue to hold steady at 60 pounds per bushel and above.
                        "Since September 1, the central part of the state has received over 60 inches of rain, and the rain got in the way of grain production early on," Lollato said.
                        The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19 (wlmailhtml:%7BC704D5B9-E012-46E9-AF1F-EE24945CFEFB%7Dmid://00000565/!x-usc:[url]http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=0015RjxyEL_dDLAfMAw8oSOzjFwWmOu7Hm_-cgNKq5AqxwUIV6vbzbbUkBx8oiW2ipPxWsMQRmfVhjVLlLSWm-EZDj-iErqI9cqBmLJqEHEiNWtE4vZEWts46eGZ5wvLMH-kUI-k5D8Toul4BZV1HzHUQ3DQGMir0Wby4R7nDJ1kleGfoJKdYAoJp _elH1yHKxqmGA52xIjQ67gF-MflMbgFWdKGTkEZ8kIYO5PbCAniSou2lroD4SFDJNV_SaLMgjG pHR_vpTbvtclTjnNNUgQWw==&c=DUvRXfOeLGTLM9R9vK7mL-7WJLU3zsOZxE2Kq0yrwsceFBNq7u0-iQ==&ch=eaW0pcInOs7K0wgPTQyAR59tMni0sVneKQr4oaYDvz Lmfim_FcooTQ==[/url]).


















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                        [TD="width: 100%, align: center"] Kansas Wheat, 1990 Kimball Ave, Manhattan, KS 66502
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                        Comment


                        • #27

















                          post it then go to the bottom of the junk after you have it posted and hit --edit-- get to the bottom of some of the junk and click at the end then just backspace till done if you go too far just type it back in it will cut your space in half and make it a lot easer to read ----------------thank you -----------------now go to lounge ROOT has new info on new Web coming I hope

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                          • #28
                            why the ***** should I edit a forwarded article all ready edited version when agweb is the problem NOT allowing the correct feed....of course, maybe after I read Root I will try harder...

                            btw, no harvest here today unless the heat and wind get with it... 0.81 in the super duper gauge
                            Last edited by dennis1; 07-09-2019, 05:00 AM. Reason: p h u c k with out the F bomb

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                            • #29
                              AHHHHHH my faith is fast waining THAT THIS SITE CAN STILL BECOME GREAT I hope but but but you have to be able to get on first-------------------------------------------dave

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                              • #30
                                crop conditions increase 1% in corn and go down 2% for beans,both remain at historically low levels,corn rating for In,Ill,ohio actually went down 3-5 pts,yet markets go down hard over night,basis levels remain at very good levels,big corn deleveries are being stopped by ADM and cargill,all bullish,very little cash corn moving as farmers dont sell a 50 cent break,yesterdays hot dry is replaced by alittle more rain,personally hot dry is what the crop need near term as long as it dosent stick thru pollination

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