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  • Kansas wheat tour 2019

    The ONE/1 clap of thunder yesterday must have been the neighbor when THEY discovered less acres and less potential and less development and less price...any more less and
    it get down right crappy...

    hope the site address works

    chit it didn't work, will try again...NOW maybe...
    More than 75 people from 25 U.S. states and 3 other countries traveled on six routes between Manhattan and Colby, Kan., Tuesday, stopping at wheat fields every 15-20 miles along the routes, as part of the Wheat Quality Council’s 2019 Hard Winter Wheat Tour.
    Last edited by dennis1; 05-01-2019, 07:15 AM.

  • #2

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    • #3
        On Wednesday, 75 people on the Wheat Quality Council’s 2019 winter wheat tour in 20 cars made their way from Colby to Wichita, Kansas, stopping in wheat fields along six different routes. One route included a trip to northern Oklahoma, as well.

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      • #4
        Its interesting to read that farmers are for going that last Nitrogen application because of a negative return on investment . Most grain farmers around here are cutting back on fertilizer rates, insecticides, fungicides and most of the micros that pay some of the time. Maybe farmers will try increasing profits by cutting expenses. The last few years have been hard on profits. The bad things is that pretty soon you've mined to soil so if prices rebound, our yields wil l suck

        Just wondering what your input costs are on growing wheat.. When We have grown winter wheat around here, the yields are usually in the range of 90 to 120 bu/acre. And we still barely break even Your yields seem lower.

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        • #5
          I hear you King...the input cost of wheat starts with land cost, crop land varies in Kansas from $1000-2700 or more, then add irrigation for the pus*ies...
          I don't have the numbers, but guessing the majority of the wheat is planted with air seeders...so it is "easier" to get the starter on and MAYBE some of the needed ( according to soil sampling or fertilizer sales people) micros at that time...
          A couple things to remember, it is Hard Red Winter Wheat that they are looking at here, although there is some white that is usually contracted at planting time for those mills.
          It used to be "standard" practice with summer fallowed wheat, neighborhood of 50 pounds of N pre-plant, some starter at planting, and THEN IF the price and weather looked
          more favorable...another 30 N top dressed...today it is a sales persons circus/bandwagon, including fungicides and herbicides.
          Today the fertility programs, much like the seeds to plant, are paid for by the farmer, in return the "experts" salaries are paid by the seed companies...implement companies etc.
          May I step on any toes?

          Today, again I don't have those numbers, BUT locally much of the wheat planted is following soybean or corn harvest, so it is later, which is good for some disease control,
          but the seeding rates are adjusted upward from 1 bushel/A...common rate from summer fallow days...through 2 bushel/A depending on date and moisture AND seed cost.

          We can do a drive by locally and see the sins of "what ever the problem" from different seed number drop, planting date, , planting depth and fertility on the same pass...depending on how many sections of the "drill" there are, lots of various strips from the road running back and forth...lol


          Last edited by dennis1; 05-02-2019, 03:55 AM.

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          • #6
            47 bu. to the acre. Boy am I relieved to see that. I've been thinking that wheat I planted the first of Nov. wasn't going to amount to anything, lol.

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            • #7
              talk is that corn and maybe spring wheat acres will get switched to beans if it stays wet,but I'm not so sure nc beans are bid @7.25 just taking PP on corn acres looks like a better deal esp since I have cattle,we can't hay or graze untill after Nov 1,but I believe I can lay it in a windrow and graze after that date.if I put up some electric fence and let them have it alittle at a time I don't think there would be much waste

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              • #8
                If the weather will give me a favorable window all mine is going to go to hay.

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                • #9
                  This is really day 3, but if you read all the stuff posted by the tour attendees, the drinking might have been more than coffee..right now I would say, 47 bu/A
                  IF someone put enough fertilizer on BUT the bottom line is what keeps us in business...if it is positive...somebody will be short is my guess...but with the
                  alcohol plants in the country, keep the splinters out and make some wheat beer!

                    On Wednesday, 75 people on the Wheat Quality Council’s 2019 winter wheat tour in 20 cars made their way from Colby to Wichita, Kansas, stopping in wheat fields along six different routes. One route included a trip to northern Oklahoma, as well.

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                  • #10
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                    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

                    May 2, 2019
                    Contact: Jordan Hildebrand, [email]jhildebrand@kswheat.com[/email]



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                    [TD="align: center"] Wheat Tour:




                    Day 3 Wrap-Up
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                    [TD="align: left"] For audio visit kansaswheat.org. ([url]http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=0015PUhxgjSNfGwzMXR4BPcLJc3iL7cnoInkJV1yA IkdelXgUPPPbL5u-JCOAc-9kgo6TA_YstCjxRPYLZDtJRu6yQKn73N4nvFZVWn8rDAs6nQHP 5jGFiw9CslC1SvGlObyPvj8wg8cBce-Tbc8H3wrGMCpqJMIjqU5mmpfI_x_2fK3d8ciXkWlaORLib4S-jo4BSvDRRUyQf63qUjRH70IY1G8ZI1Nau5fGQR9HzzP-I=&c=1UQve50xrL2SUwxNqTwuduqd0GOFUhTdoAVst6kAUHiEY pUdRMz9IQ==&ch=vMkWQhSGQpNEIrMj8fEDL1bWQwkj8n3TPQm DUr_liAgWIdkk9_Xlmg==[/url])













                    The 2019 Wheat Quality Council's Hard Winter Wheat Tour across Kansas wrapped up on May 2. During the three days of wheat scouting, tour participants traveled six routes from Manhattan to Colby to Wichita and back to Manhattan. This year's tour hosted 75 participants from three countries and 25 states in 20 vehicles while traveling across the state.

                    The three-day average yield for the fields that were calculated was 47.2 bushels an acre. While an estimated 7 million acres of wheat were planted in the fall, the Kansas wheat crop varies in condition based on planting date. Wheat that was planted prior to October rains looks good while wheat planted when farmers could get back in fields after the rains is not faring as well. What Mother Nature has in plan for the wheat crop still remains unseen, but the tour captures a moment in time for the yield potential for fields across the state. Tour participants saw wheat that was significantly behind schedule, with most areas a week to 10 days behind normal development.

                    Many tour participants had never stepped foot in a wheat field before. These are the millers, bakers, food processors and traders who buy the wheat that Kansas farmers grow. If these fields make it to harvest, the resulting crop will go into breads, but also a number of other food items, from snack cakes to donuts to seasonings, batters and coatings for fish, chicken and appetizers.

                    Farmers were also in attendance so customers were able to interact with the men and women who produce the product they purchase. Gary Millershaski, a farmer from Lakin, is a wheat tour veteran who believes in the value of the opportunity to get these customers out in the field (and to get their boots a little muddy, too).

                    "The connections that we make on this tour are unlike anything else," said Millershaski. "Having producers and our customers driving around in the same vehicles, there's just a lot of information that gets shared both ways. It helps them learn about the challenges of production and the frustration of the prices we get, and we get to learn about the changing dynamics between them and their customers. It helps to put faces to the wheat they receive. We're not a number to them after the tour... We're real."

                    The official tour projection for total production of wheat to be harvested in Kansas is 306.5 million bushels. This number is calculated based on the average of estimated predictions from tour participants who gathered information from 469 fields across the state.

                    Scouts reported seeing widely varying wheat conditions (due, in large part, to planting date) along the route. While there were sightings of rust and other disease in south central Kansas, many stops saw signs of nitrogen deficiency.

                    In addition, scouts from Nebraska and Colorado met the group in Colby, Kansas, to give reports from their states. The estimate for the Nebraska wheat crop is 47.4 million bushels, down from 49.5 million bushels last year. The estimated yield average is 44 bushels per acre. In Colorado, the estimated yield was 46.5 bushels per acre. Production in Colorado is estimated at 97.2 million bushels, up from 70.5 million bushels last year. Oklahoma reported that the state's production is estimated at 119.27 million bushels with 37.38 bushels per acre. Approximately 4.2 million acres were seeded last fall.

                    For more information about what participants saw statewide, search #wheattour19 ([url]http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=0015PUhxgjSNfGwzMXR4BPcLJc3iL7cnoInkJV1yA IkdelXgUPPPbL5u_3B6Wi39ZhwdkMeDP2FDYHW4Xvdxp3ncz0q 61k8b7nAsqtT52ECKjnKg34nyVarDNASPNI6bUOdyYEBYZu0m_ StsoKD8Pl-TlrZsj-8Sip6Q7WpfyxmmPCimMW-mPK3Vie3z8aDoNoBbmP3w2LlLx7wtkFFv8_Qr4NYuCFmGBusjB izTRWF7DByboXgeJkZKw==&c=1UQve50xrL2SUwxNqTwuduqd0 GOFUhTdoAVst6kAUHiEYpUdRMz9IQ==&ch=vMkWQhSGQpNEIrM j8fEDL1bWQwkj8n3TPQmDUr_liAgWIdkk9_Xlmg==[/url]) on Twitter.








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                    • #11
                      NOT sure what the problem is, but do hope if you are interested, you can find ONE of the links that works...

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                      • #12
                        How in the wold can one get a good estimate on what wheat will yield? Surely you can not count the kernels?

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                        • #13
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                          FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

                          June 27, 2019
                          Contact: Marsha Boswell, [email]mboswell@kswheat.com[/email] (wlmailhtml:%7BC704D5B9-E012-46E9-AF1F-EE24945CFEFB%7Dmid://00000110/!x-usc:mailto:mboswell@kswheat.com)



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                          Day 2, Kansas Wheat Harvest Report[/TD]
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                          by Peyton Powell, Kansas Wheat Communications Intern




                          For audio file, please visit kansaswheat.org. (wlmailhtml:%7BC704D5B9-E012-46E9-AF1F-EE24945CFEFB%7Dmid://00000110/!x-usc:[url]http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001fsonOBLpj0nsywznzo8HSSbDz4sdDYfXUqEZOI 4xNwofdKaGB3ydCvFiv97Bhoeut2Eti8gOBN2CtqAXx6lncrYz 3KF66QJ1jpUHNpCbxQw1hyVMRzVVlXApkgTDt6kVptPxEmfE-tyhiT5A-37owDVJMrgyWexoiHGfzzMhkOeTUAf2r8NGzolMfbxzff2wGt-1BuyYHogT1Bj0ijPqBzpOcDsnTLsonuOohSXQoMqT5WJEh-7Iiw==&c=LKFxDhQSE75uirl1n_8Y8gzeG0SBraGTSyoWvJp2n _znCiTEBPn69A==&ch=WhatKMtGrKOPJ70lfYpp-n0EfBF1RUaTjkovffxI03F8uo5xproRRQ==[/url])



                          This is day 2 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.
                          Wheat harvest finally started to get some momentum in Kansas on Wednesday and Thursday of this week. Many farmers would already be done with their wheat harvest, but due to cool weather and rain delays, the state has experienced one of its latest starts. Mostly depending upon planting dates and amount of moisture, harvest has begun in some areas to the north even before their neighbors to the south have started. With combines beginning to roll, farmers are finding the silver lining in this year's wheat harvest.
                          Chris Boyd, a farmer in Medicine Lodge, just began harvesting wheat on June 27. Others in the area began as early as last Friday, but weekend showers brought them to a halt for a few days. Boyd says they are starting later than usual this year, typically finishing harvest around June 30. Boyd says his yields are really spotty in the fields and doesn't have enough wheat cut yet to report yield averages.
                          Derek Sawyer, who farms near McPherson, says that their wheat harvest is off to a late start, and they are fighting the mud in the fields. Thursday was a good day for them, meaning it was a dry one. Sawyer's yields are all over, he says, ranging from 30-75 within the same field.
                          "It all just depends on how much rain sat there and the slope of the field; some places are better than others," said Sawyer. With obstacles such as machinery breakdowns, Sawyer is powering through his wheat harvest.
                          Janell and Brad Aust, of Aust Farms in LaCygne, Kansas, have kicked off their harvest in southeast Kansas. While most of the state grows hard red winter, the Austs live close to the Missouri border and farm soft red winter wheat. Their yield numbers have been a little below average this year due to rain. While wheat is not their main farming crop, it is still an important one to them. They are hoping to finish harvest this weekend.
                          "Our backyard is like the Lake of the Ozarks," says Aust. "The flooding is so bad in Linn County that a drive that normally takes less than 10 minutes, turned into almost an hour just to get to the field we are harvesting," Aust says. The Austs are staying hopeful that the rain will stay away long enough to finish this year's wheat harvest.
                          The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19 (wlmailhtml:%7BC704D5B9-E012-46E9-AF1F-EE24945CFEFB%7Dmid://00000110/!x-usc:[url]http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001fsonOBLpj0nsywznzo8HSSbDz4sdDYfXUqEZOI 4xNwofdKaGB3ydCvFiv97BhoeuZkCv9a0WWToHOCjS-VbgvL4HXgyAXI8isfNe9LHsT1-3yYWhEmOqEvxevlp_FxoNTKWEkthX49ea53md7q_RRVAWalvLJ Am93-UjOAZC8XN4YCmP3AgfyeTOxw0VV10Sy0-XaYubX3gqBU-i25TahxzPo_OJapr5&c=LKFxDhQSE75uirl1n_8Y8gzeG0SBra GTSyoWvJp2n_znCiTEBPn69A==&ch=WhatKMtGrKOPJ70lfYpp-n0EfBF1RUaTjkovffxI03F8uo5xproRRQ==[/url]).

















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                          • #14
                            have had 2 different groups of people stayinf at our lodge this week,both from the se part of the state about 50-60 miles apart from each other,one group said only 30-40 % of corn and beans were planted and everything else would be pp,the other said only 20% was planted and that they to were done trying pp also was what they were doing,it appears that SD is going to have a lot of PP acres will be down alot

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                            • #15
                              just heard that corn planted as a cover crop must be drilled @80,000/ac and you cant use bin run seed because of patent protections,if you need silage plant cane or forage sorghum way cheaper,but finding seed may be a problem

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