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    Day 2, Kansas Wheat Harvest Report
    For audio file and more photos, please visit kansaswheat.org.


    This is day 2 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.


    The 2018 Kansas wheat harvest continued to roll on throughout the beginning of the week. Monday's Crop Progress Report estimated that 2% of Kansas wheat acres had been cut through the weekend, but with warm, dry and windy conditions, harvested acres will continue to quickly rise.


    David Janzen, a Butler County farmer, reported that his family's harvest started Monday evening. Other farmers in the community had reported slightly lower than normal test weights, but Janzen said that all of their loads had been over 60 pounds per bushel. Rain was on everyone's minds during the growing season, but unfortunately it wasn't in the cards for Janzen and his neighbors. While the wheat started off with a bit of rain early during planting, its next measurable relief was toward the end its maturity, which meant it was too little, too late. He estimated most of his wheat had received around three to four inches of rain throughout its growth while normally his area would receive more than 10 inches.


    Lack of rain meant little to no disease pressure for the area. Janzen was also concerned about a few late season freezes, but while some white tips can be seen on wheat heads, he felt like it had not had the impact on yields that he had predicted. Yields were averaging in the mid-thirties, a pleasant surprise for Janzen.


    Jack Queen, manager of the Farmers Coop Elevator in Halstead, reported that his location received its first load of wheat on June 7. While that day was a few days earlier than average it was considerably earlier than what many would have predicted a month ago.


    "When it doesn't rain and it gets hot it speeds things right along," said Queen.


    Queen reported that yields are ranging from 25-50 bushels with the large spread being attributed to use of fertilizer and spotty rains that some fields had received. Test weights have held well, ranging from 59-62 pounds per bushel. Proteins are averaging in the 13 percent range, which is about a percent and a half above what the location has seen in the last few years.


    The Halstead area had also received a few late season freezes, but they didn't affect yields like many had predicted. Lack of rain also contributed to a lack of disease in his area. Queen reported that spray applications had been 10% of what a normal year would bring. If rains continue to evade the area, Queen thinks that harvest will wrap up next week.


    The 2018 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest18.

  • #2
    Day 3, Kansas Wheat Harvest Report
    For audio file and more photos, please visit kansaswheat.org.


    This is day 3 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.


    Clouds may have covered most of the state throughout Wednesday, but the rain, rain kept away from the harvesting acres for yet another day during #wheatharvest18.


    Jan Strunk, a farmer from Colwich, reported that he and his crew are wrapping up and are hoping to be finished by Wednesday evening. Test cutting started on Monday, June 4, and ramped up to full force harvesting by Tuesday, June 5. Strunk said that he is expecting an overall average of about 35 bushels per acre.


    "The heads just didn't fill out," said Strunk. "There were only half the amount of kernels that we normally have. It's a lot of factors in that, the drought, shallow root systems and the freeze."


    While Strunk didn't have official word from his local elevator on his protein levels, he predicts that they will be higher than previous years. Test weights are averaging about 59.5 pounds per bushel.


    "We've been pretty fortunate that we'd had several good harvests back to back before this one," Strunk said. "We can't have a bumper crop every year, unfortunately. That's just the nature of the business."


    Brad Wedel, manager of the Moundridge branch of Mid-Kansas Co-op, reported receiving his first load on June 7. He estimates that they are nearly 50 percent complete. Quality is looking good for Moundridge farmers, but yields remain as elusive as the Kansas rain.


    "Right now we're averaging around 59 pounds per bushel," sad Wedel. "Our benchmark is 60, but we were honestly expecting much lower."


    Proteins in the area are very high this year, with Wedel estimating an average between 13-14 percent.


    "In the previous few years 13 was considered high," said Wedel. "This year, that will be a bit lower than average. In 30 years in the business I think this is the highest protein crop I've seen."


    Wedel reported that yields range from 25-45 bushels per acre this season. Lower yields can be attributed to a lack of rain on the plains this year and a few late freezes in the area.


    "Even though yields are lower this year, I think it's important to point out that technologies we have now, have really helped the crop survive the curveballs that nature throws at it," Wedel said. "If we would have had these conditions 30 years ago, we would have been looking at single digits to 15 bushels per acre."


    The 2018 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest18.

    Comment


    • #3
      Day 4, Kansas Wheat Harvest Report
      For audio file, please visit kansaswheat.org.


      This is day 4 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.


      Jacquelyne Leffler, a farmer near Americus in Lyon County, reported that high humidity has inhibited their cutting over the last few days. While Leffler started harvesting on Saturday, she estimated that Leffler, Inc., will wrap up cutting with three 'big days' of work.


      Yields have ranged drastically for Leffler. Their top field so far has averaged more than 75 bushels per acre, with fungicide and well-timed sprinkles. Well-timed doesn't mean copious, however, since that field saw only 9.6 inches of rain since it was planted. Other fields have averaged 63, 52 and 36 bushels per acre which supports that well-timed precipitation can make a world of difference.


      Test weights have ranged from 61 to 62 pounds per bushel. Proteins for the Lefflers are running about 12 percent, a bump from recent years.


      "We have had some local elevators offer protein premiums," said Leffler. "We are trying to capitalize on those markets and their demands as much as we can. Having that incentive is a game changer."


      Justin Knopf, a Gypsum farmer, reported an overall low average yield with a range between the low 30s to mid 40 bushels per acre. Knopf said that he was disheartened at the lack of rain this year, but estimated that his fields were about eight inches below average rainfall.


      "Because of that, combined with the exceptional heat that we received during grainfill, we knew that there would be fewer bushels," said Knopf. "Although, the wheat performing as well as it has during this tough of a year is a real testament to wheat breeders, agronomists and the technologies we have."


      Proteins in Knopf's area will be 'exceptional,' reported Knopf. He said that the average range for many of his fields has been 14-15 percent. While the lack of rain has put a damper on this year's harvest for the Knopfs, Justin remains hopeful for the time spent in the fields.


      "Even though this is a hectic time of year, we're just out here trying to enjoy our time as a family," said Knopf. "Despite the heat, we love the opportunity that we have to work together day in and day out to provide this staple food crop for the world."


      The 2018 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest18.

      Comment


      • #4
        Well day three here of our wheat harvest. For the most part, moisture has been 13 or below. Test weight has been 59 to 61. Don't have a clue what the protein is. Wasn't expecting much for yield and so far, my expectations have been met. What did they project the ks average was going to be, 38? Ain't going to make it.

        Comment


        • #5
          June 17, 2018
          Contact: Marsha Boswell, [email protected]

          Day 5, Kansas Wheat Harvest Report
          For audio file, please visit kansaswheat.org.


          This is day 5 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.


          Families gathered around grills and couches across the state on Sunday to celebrate Father's Day, but many farm families celebrated with a view from the combine cab. Harvest continued to progress quickly through Kansas with sizzling hot temperatures and dry winds blowing through the fields. Farmers are harvesting very quickly for fear that their crop may just turn into toast if kept in sight of the sun for much longer.


          Todd Pauley, a Sedgwick County farmer, reported that his harvest lasted a little less than a week. Yields for Pauley ranged from 30-40 bushels per acre. He said that during the growing season, there was a difference of five to six inches of rain between his home in Garden Plain and his farm ten miles away.


          "We definitely got less rain than normal, this year," said Pauley. "But we were fortunate that we had enough to keep us going."


          Test weights averaged 60 pounds per bushel for Pauley, and he reported that there was minimal disease found in his area.


          "Harvest went really fast this year," said Pauley. "We had no rain while we were cutting, so we were able to get it out of the field really quickly. I'm just glad to be done."


          Derek Sawyer, a McPherson county farmer, reported that he is around 85 percent complete with #wheatharvest18. Sawyer said his first load was cut June 11, so his family's harvest should last just a little over one week. Even with a little rain that first night, Sawyer was able to resume cutting on Tuesday. His crew had to wait patiently on Wednesday since it was 'damp, dreary and not much could happen.'


          Thursday meant go time for the Sawyers, and harvest has gone smoothly since. While Sawyer reported an average range of upper 30s to mid-40 bushels per acre, he has heard everything from six to 60 bushels per acre in the community.


          "Yields have been all over the board," said Sawyer. "Those differences in yield rely heavily on spotty rains and farming practices. But I have been pleasantly surprised with our yields. I was expecting much worse."


          Drought has been an issue weighing heavily on farmers' minds this year, and Sawyer has witnessed some unexpected effects in his own operation.


          "We are cutting through regular mud holes that I don't ever remember harvesting in the last 30 years," said Sawyer. "I don't even remember a crop ever growing in them. But this year there are good looking stands in a lot of them, so we are harvesting it. This dryness is just unprecedented in my memory."


          While Sawyer doesn't have exact numbers, he does expect protein content to be well above average this year.


          "We have huge piles of wheat from last year that I expect will be blended off pretty easily," Sawyer said.


          Nicole Small, a Wilson County farmer, reported that her family is about halfway complete with harvest after an unexpected windstorm took its toll on property, crops and their time in the combine.


          "We had a huge windstorm that knocked us out for about four days of cutting," Small said. "We heard neighbors say anything from 75-100 mile per hour in-line winds."


          The wind blew an old grain bin about 50 yards away from its original location, brought down decades old pecan and hedge apple trees (which then landed on a fence and granted some of Small's cattle some temporary freedom) and even shredded some wheat stems to further complicate this year's harvest.


          Small reported a range of 35-65 bushels per acre, with an average seeming to float in the upper 40s. She said that her area was about 4 inches of rain behind average.


          "It's turned out to be a better harvest than I expected," said Small. "The wheat is really short, so I wasn't expecting hardly anything to be in the heads, but it's been surprising."


          The 2018 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest18.

          Comment


          • #6
            Looks like marsha is having a finger counting problem, like the yield expectations by the tour groupy, there will be some fair yields, won't be from this part of the
            world either 4450.

            Does the wind blow from the south where you be?

            Comment


            • #7
              I don't know if it's getting more windy the past few years or I just like it less. Had to shut the unloading auger off when it got down to the last bit coming out of the bin. Wind was blowing so hard the wheat wouldn't hit the truck. The rubber spout on the end of the unloading tube would blow together until the grain started going through it.

              Comment


              • #8
                lol, had a cruise nite on Main street and school class reunions this week end, not seeing some of those people for over 55 years, they sure are getting old!

                Comment


                • #9
                  I thought your town got flooded out

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    NOT YET! Wait until Tuesday evening..but when they start promising big stuff, the wolf whistle has already been blown..

                    It is a warm muggy morning, still dew in the grass 11:30, sw 15-20mph, to get to 96؛ this afternoon, commercial applicator followed me home and went on to
                    spray dicamba on "something". The wheat is turning GREENER, weeds are going to be above the heads in a lot of the fields, in a couple days! l NOT a pretty picture,
                    poor wheat and more expense to attempt to harvest the stuff...48 would be laughing his butt off, "shoud'a should'a grazed it out...butt there wasn't anything to graze,
                    so roll over and try it again... Still fun telling the wheat people that it is one cover crop that I can get insurance on, NOW the county west of us can get insurance on
                    peas, but by the time you go through the doughnut hoops and dance with their requirements, NOT going to make anything out of the exercise as diagramed!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Day 6, Kansas Wheat Harvest Report
                      by Jordan Hildebrand, Program Assistant


                      For audio file, please visit kansaswheat.org.


                      This is day 6 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.


                      USDA NASS released the Kansas Crop Progress report on Monday afternoon which estimated that harvest was 23 percent complete at the end of June 17. This is an increase both in comparison to last year (19 percent) and the five-year average of 11 percent. Winter wheat condition rated 15 percent very poor, 31 poor, 36 fair, 16 good, and 2 excellent. Winter wheat coloring was 94 percent, equal to last year, and ahead of 88 for the five-year average. Mature was 64 percent, ahead of 57 last year.


                      Jay Armstrong, a farmer from Atchison County, reported that he finished his harvest on Monday. Armstrong's farm average for his wheat harvest was 61 bushels per acre with a test weight of 59 pounds per bushel.


                      "We did have small kernels this year which made it difficult to set the combine," said Armstrong.


                      Armstrong said that he was especially impressed with the Kansas Wheat Alliance variety Zenda.


                      "It stood well when we had some pounding rains that actually green snapped corn that was planted around the fields," said Armstrong.


                      #Wheatharvest18 doesn't just stop for farmers when the last swath of a field is cut; marketing decisions are also an important factor weighing on farmers' minds as their combine header rolls on.


                      "Our basis here was at five cents per bushel," reported Armstrong. "I can't remember when I saw a basis that narrow at harvest."


                      Jenny Goering, a farmer in McPherson County, reported that her family operation wrapped up the first leg of their harvest on Saturday. While their ground close to home is harvested, Goering will be heading to western Kansas on Tuesday to start harvesting acreage in Kearny County.


                      Late season frosts did some damage to Goering's McPherson County acres.


                      "Those frosts hurt our crop really badly, especially after it had just barely survived with the drought," said Goering. "There were a few days in April that just really hurt those yields."


                      Those yields ranged 30-32 bushels per acre, a decrease from recent years. Test weights ranged from 60-62 pounds per bushel.


                      "We're glad that it's over, but we're gearing up to head west," said Goering. "Now that we're done here, we would definitely welcome a rain at our Central Kansas farm."


                      Craig Bennett, general manager of the Farmers Coop in Abbyville, reported that his location saw their first load of wheat on June 8. At this point, Bennett said, their harvest is nearing 95 percent completion.


                      "It's gone pretty fast," said Bennett. "We had a few sprinkles this afternoon, but that hasn't slowed them down any."


                      Yields for the area are better than expected for many of Bennett's farmers, but still lower than recent years. Test weights are about 60 pounds per bushel and proteins are running 12 percent and above.


                      April freezes also affected acres, and yields, near Abbyville this year.


                      "Late frosts really hurt some of the varieties out there, but some of them held up pretty well, all things considered," said Bennett.


                      The 2018 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest18.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        welp, looks like ses knew when to get the hell out of dudge hilly city...

                        https://www.facebook.com/MarkLarson1...type=3&theater

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Well here at least, now you can insure double crop beans. Drier than a popcorn fart, even the pig weeds are showing stress, and you can drill beans into wheat stubble and insure them. Since those are the current rules, I guess I should jump on the bandwagon too. But I think it's wrong.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            A lot of county by county insurance differences, and in many, IF you were to do it without insurance, you "probably" wouldn't do it...

                            on the same note, several years ago when I started planting milo or forage feed in freshly harvested wheat stubble for extra feed and grazing, the now ascs girls told me
                            I needed to be able to have insurance or they COULDN'T report it, come to find out, report it and some insurance agency decided they wanted a crack at coverage,,,who
                            knows?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              RELEASE
                              June 19, 2018
                              Contact: Marsha Boswell, [email protected]

                              Day 7, Kansas Wheat Harvest Report
                              by Jordan Hildebrand, Program Assistant


                              For audio file, please visit kansaswheat.org.


                              This is day 7 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.


                              Combines are rolling quickly along the plains as farmers prepare for rains that may stall their harvest progress. Many areas in south central and eastern Kansas have harvested their final acres, but the race against rain is well under way in western, central and north central portions of the state. While this precipitation is welcome for those who have fall crops, it's too little, too late for the 2018 Kansas whe at crop.


                              Jennifer Princ, manager of the Midway Coop Association in Luray, reported that they received their first load on June 14 and are currently around 30 percent complete with the area's harvest. This year's yields are averaging around 35-40 bushels per acre, but Princ has heard reports of yields as low as 20 and as high as 67. Princ estimates the final average yield will be well below the area's normal yield average of 45-50 bushels per acre.


                              While yields have fallen, Princ said that the average test weight is 61 pounds per bushel. Proteins are averaging 12.4 percent, 1.2 percent higher than 2017.


                              Lack of moisture isn't the only thing holding back this year's crop. Princ said her farmers are reporting quite a few white heads in fields caused by several late freezes. In addition, while ripe wheat is being harvested quickly, there is a bit of green wheat still out in the field.


                              "There's still quite a bit of green wheat in some of the fields out there," said Princ. "If we don't get the rain that was predicted this week, we'll probably have some guys who have to stall and wait for their wheat to dry down. It all just varies with variety and plant date."


                              Randy Acker, manager of the Meade Coop Elevator in Meade, reports that the area is around 90 percent harvested. If they don't receive rain, they will wrap up in about two or three days. His location took in its first load on June 9.


                              "This year will be a short harvest in duration and a short harvest in receipts," reported Acker. "We didn't catch enough rain to raise a wheat crop but I am surprised by the quality."


                              The Meade Coop Elevator is averaging about 60 pounds per bushel in test weight. While there was no substantial disease pressure in the area, weeds in fields may quickly become a serious issue for farmers who aren't finished harvesting.


                              "If it rains, some acres may have to be abandoned because of the excessive weed growth," said Acker. "Some things you can control, but weather isn't one of them."


                              Terry Mohl, location manager of United Prairie Ag in Hugoton, reported the area is about 50 percent harvested. Mohl said he thinks this year's yields will be considerably less than average - not great, but better than expected. He expects that when the last bushel has been brought into his location, they will have taken in about half the total bushels they would in an average year. The wheat is averaging 60 pounds per bushel for test weight, and protein is averaging close to 12. Mohl also showed concern for the lack of precipitation in the area.


                              "We went half a year without any measurable precipitation," said Mohl. "We have 10 days of harvest left if we don't get any weather, but the clouds are building up now. It won't do us any good for our wheat, but the rest of our crops could sure use a drink."


                              The 2018 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest18.

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