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  • Good read ECI, but out here where we spray to kill the weeds, and not irrigate the crop,,,,,that velvet leaf gets hard to kill unless you turn up the pressure and have a fog so the underneath side
    of that leaf gets some product!


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    • good observation Root water reactivation now here is another scenario to think about it seams Arkansas is the eppa center for the worst damage on dicamba --rice --water -standing water +methane gas---would this gas make dicamba drift worse where the damage is bad usly rice in near ---------------------------dave

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      • It was just a outside the box idea I had with that reactivation due to rain. We put extra surfactants in to make stuff not drift during application and the stick to the plant better in case it rains to early why wouldn't it make sense not all the active ingredients in the products we spray should have longer re-entry limits because not everything has been metabolized by the plants as quick as we are used to. I hear it can take up to ten days almost two weeks before noticeable results from spraying these new dicamba formulations.
        Don't get tripped by what's behind you

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        • this will still make you wonder about some applications and the complaints they caused...


          http://www.southeastfarmpress.com/co...3c31c5cacf15e0

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          • CAUTION may cause some spots on some users monitor screens...solution, just refill coffee cup


            https://www.aganytime.com/Documents/...%20Farmers.pdf

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            • https://www.hayspost.com/2017/10/14/...-appplication/

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              • Finally got an article that lists some names, or towns....479 had text me that agtalk had a thread going, but it was like politics, NOTHING of value unless you wanted to spread rumors...lol

                anyway, if you have missed it, a beginning for those next to those arkys who must cross state borders to reproduce...



                http://www.missouriruralist.com/herb...90cbc6f1738281

                heres the stuff:

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                • I seen were one was fined a little over 62 grand ! I'm guessing that all were farmers - no commercial guys . What will be interesting to me - is what product they used - I'm wondering ? Clarity ? I've seen that chit move before .

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                  • A VERY good read out of The - Ohio State !

                    The difficulty in legally applying dicamba – weather factors
                    You are here
                    Home » C.O.R.N. Newsletter » 2017-41
                    Author(s):
                    Mark Loux

                    Labels for the dicamba products approved for use on Xtend soybeans, Engenia, FeXapan, and XtendiMax, were recently revised, and are now generally more restrictive in an effort to prevent some of the problems with off target injury that occurred in 2017. *Whether these additional restrictions do much to prevent volatility is doubtful, but this aside, one of the problems with labels this restrictive is the difficulty in even finding enough time to make legal applications. *It can be an interesting exercise to review past weather conditions with the goal of determining legal windows of application, taking these restrictions into account. *Weed scientists at Purdue University conducted this type of analysis for west central Indiana for June 2017, and came up with a total of 48 hours when it would have been legal to apply (hours of dawn to dusk, wind speeds between 3 and 10 mph). * *
                    We conducted a similar analysis, used weather information for June of 2017 at the Dayton International Airport. *Assumptions in determining the legally sprayable hours for the month: * 30 days, 6 am to 7 pm, wind 3 to 10 mph. *Days with rain were considered to have no sprayable hours, along with those when rain occurred the next day, since it’s not legal to apply if rain is in the 24-hr forecast. *We did not take inversions into account since it could not be determined whether these occurred from the weather data, but we did some additional calculations just to show what happens if hours when temperature was above 85 were omitted (when spray droplet evaporation and volatility would be more likely). *We also ignored the fact that maximum wind and wind gusts exceeded the hourly weather observations on almost all days, and this could further restrict applicators, depending upon how often they measured wind speed. *The spreadsheet with all of these figures is shown below. *Here’s how it shook out:
                    - There was a total of 390 possible hours to apply, assuming that applicators are willing to work 13 hours a day every day of the month. *Taking into account the wind speed and rain forecast, there was a total of 77 hours when it would have been legal to apply the dicamba products. *Omitting any of these hours when temperature exceeded 85, number of sprayable hours declined to 70. *
                    - Disregarding the 85-degree limit, there was a total of 12 days with at least 2 legally sprayable hours, but only 8 days with more than 3 sprayable hours. **
                    - Days with legally sprayable hours were not evenly distributed throughout the month. *The second half of June was fairly windy apparently. *There were 9 days with at least 2 sprayable hours between June 1 and 16, but only three days between June 17 and the end of the month. *And there was a total of only 11 sprayable hours in those three days after June 17.
                    - We ran some some rough calculations on how much ground can be covered by an applicator running a 100 ft boom at 15 mph relative to the legally sprayable hours. * An applicator running at 15 mph with a 100 ft boom can in theory cover 181.8 acres per hour, which we rounded to 170 acres per hour factoring in some load and transport time (readers probably have a much better idea of the actual feasible number here then we do). *So an applicator could possibly apply dicamba to about 13,000 acres in those 77 hours of legal spray time. *But in the second half of June when there were only 11 hours, the applicator could cover only 1870 acres.
                    - The weather data can be mined for a couple of other interesting pieces of information. *First, in following the dicamba labels, it’s important to determine to which fields dicamba can be applied on a given day based on wind direction and the location of sensitive crops or areas. *The weather information from Dayton indicate that wind direction is frequently quite variable throughout the day, which makes this determination more complicated. *Looking at the 12 days with sprayable hours, the wind directon had variability of 90 degrees or less on 8 days, and more than this on the rest. *Assuming that the wind remained low enough to apply during a day, one would still have to continually assess what sensitive areas might be downwind based on changing wind direction. *
                    - One can also determine for those days with legally sprayable hours, whether the primary wind directions remain relatively unchanged over the next two days following application. *This can be important if the one assumes that dicamba could revolatilize over those following two days and move with prevailing winds. *In this case, for only 5 of the 12 days with sprayable hours did wind direction remain relatively the same over the following two days. *So for the other 7 days, if some revolatilization did occur subsequent to application, and the wind direction changed, the potential exists to injure crops that were not actually downwind from the treated field on the day of application. *
                    *
                    It’s probably possible to quibble with some of these figures depending upon what parameters for day length are used, etc, and what location is used for weather information. *But this does not negate the overall message – managing dicamba applications will be complicated. *Just some food for thought as we move into another year of weed killing. *Safe holidays everyone

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                    • I will start this tread again ----------Arkansas has banned dicamba again for the year 2018 and the saga continues---------------------------------dave

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                      • Arkansas legislative panel backs proposal to ban herbicand

                        and it continues -----------------------------dave


                        LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas lawmakers recommended regulators move forward Tuesday with efforts to ban an herbicide that farmers in several states say has drifted onto their crops and caused damage, advancing the prohibition despite a lawsuit by a maker of the weed killer.
                        A legislative subcommittee supported the state Plant Board's proposal to ban the use of dicamba from April 16 through Oct. 31. The proposed ban is scheduled to go before the Legislative Council, the Legislature's main governing body when lawmakers aren't in session, for a final vote on Friday.
                        The Plant Board earlier this month stood by the proposed ban after lawmakers urged the panel to consider revising the proposal.
                        Dicamba has been around for decades, but problems arose over the past couple of years as farmers began to use it to kill invasive weeds in soybean and cotton fields where specially engineered seeds had been planted to resist the herbicide. Because it can easily evaporate after being applied, the chemical sometimes settles on neighboring fields planted with seeds that are not resistant to dicamba.
                        Lawmakers endorsed the ban after hearing from farmers who have been sharply divided over the restriction. The Plant Board last year approved a temporary ban on the herbicide's sale and use, and has received nearly 1,000 complaints about dicamba. Farmers have also complained about dicamba causing damage to their crops in other states, including Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota and Tennessee.
                        "We are only asking for a pause in this until we get our hands around this and figure out what we can do," David Wildy, a farmer from east Arkansas, told the panel. "We can't allow this to happen again."
                        Opponents of the ban said it would put Arkansas at a competitive disadvantage with other states that haven't gone as far in restricting the weed killer.
                        "Give the farmers in this state an opportunity to compete with the rest of the U.S.," said Joe Mencer, a soybean farmer from southeast Arkansas.
                        Sen. Bill Sample, the Legislative Council's co-chairman, said he backed the ban even though he had initially asked the board to reconsider its proposal.
                        "I was satisfied that the science was proven," the Republican lawmaker said.
                        Monsanto, which makes dicamba, has filed a lawsuit in Pulaski County Circuit Court challenging the ban and claiming the Plant Board exceeded its authority in prohibiting the weed killer. A hearing is scheduled next month in the Missouri-based company's lawsuit, which seeks to block the state from enforcing the ban.
                        "This vote would put Arkansas farmers at a serious disadvantage and we ask the executive committee to set this right for growers. We will continue to pursue our legal challenge. We will continue to stand with Arkansas growers who need new tools for weed control," Scott Partridge, Monsanto's vice president of global strategy, said in a statement.

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                        • Hey Dave - Is the ban only for the new stuff - OR all dicamba's ? Like the old stuff - Status - Charity - are they good to go ??

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                          • no dicamba period--------------------------dave

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                            • Just attended the engenia training/certification class this morning. It was very informative. All the restrictions will make the allowable time to spray pretty limited it looks to me. But if we can at least use it pre-plant it will still be an advantage to where we were two years ago. Asked the one seed dealer I drink coffee with what they sold for seed so far. He said 90% dicamba tolerant vs. 70% last year. Know of two neighbors this year switching to dicamba from liberty, not because of the dinging so much as dissatisfaction with the job liberty did for them.

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                              • 3rd year in a row 100% Liberty sales for me.

                                After the visible damage done in our area no interest at all from my customers.

                                Don't know about yield loss but the drive by was bad enough to convince most people.

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