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  • future crop production

    "To understand how climate change could impact both double cropping and the overall amount of land in production, the researchers looked at satellite images of Mato Grosso’s fields over an eight year period. If a section of land turned green and then quickly brown, that meant that the parcel of land was being used for agricultural purposes (growing and then harvest). If there were two periods of green, that meant that the area was used for double cropping.
    By combining historical climate data with this new data set created from the satellite imagery, the researchers concluded that a 1 degree Celsius increase in temperature was enough to reduce agricultural productivity in the region by nine to 13 percent. But perhaps more importantly, the researchers were able to discover that 70 percent of the total reduction in agricultural output in the region due to climate change could be attributed to both land changes and changes in double cropping. Crop yield, by contrast, only accounted for 30 percent of the overall reduction.
    “Our estimates of the vulnerability of agriculture to climate change have mostly used yield as a proxy for output,” Cohn said. “In this region, we showed pretty clearly that yield is not a good proxy for output.”

    -- researchers from Brown and Tufts universities

  • #2
    Sounds like research from the Brown and Puckered University endowed by liberal tree huggersa

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Freedom farmer View Post
      "To understand how climate change could impact both double cropping and the overall amount of land in production, the researchers looked at satellite images of Mato Grosso’s fields over an eight year period. If a section of land turned green and then quickly brown, that meant that the parcel of land was being used for agricultural purposes (growing and then harvest). If there were two periods of green, that meant that the area was used for double cropping.
      By combining historical climate data with this new data set created from the satellite imagery, the researchers concluded that a 1 degree Celsius increase in temperature was enough to reduce agricultural productivity in the region by nine to 13 percent. But perhaps more importantly, the researchers were able to discover that 70 percent of the total reduction in agricultural output in the region due to climate change could be attributed to both land changes and changes in double cropping. Crop yield, by contrast, only accounted for 30 percent of the overall reduction.
      “Our estimates of the vulnerability of agriculture to climate change have mostly used yield as a proxy for output,” Cohn said. “In this region, we showed pretty clearly that yield is not a good proxy for output.”

      -- researchers from Brown and Tufts universities

      Pure unadulterated bull chit from the copy and paste ignoramus of all time, yours truly frooty frootloops! "In this region, we showed pretty clearly that yield is not a good proxy for output." "Our estimates of the vulnerability of agriculture to climate change have mostly used yield as a proxy for output." DUH!

      Recently, researchers have come to the conclusion by combining historical data from satellite imagery that frooty frootloops brain is 70% less productive due to the 1 degree Celsius increase in temperature. The brain activity in most liberal dimtards seems to be diminishing only by 30% by standards used today, but frooty's brain is of the exception being in the 70 percentile or greater. As the earth's temperature increases or decreases depending on the weather at any given time frame, brown areas will be subject to occur meaning those subjects will be shown as large turds for the most part. These occurrences could cause reduced productivity in these regions by 9 to 13 percent. Scientists have recently called these subjects chit for brains for the lack of a better term.

      -- researchers from Box. Rocks, Dumber Than University

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      • #4
        anyone else heard theres some farm ground without a farmer.Talked to several guys who said some tenants walked away from leases due to high rents and so far landlord still did'nt lower rent enuf to find someone willing to take it on.How will this impact planted acres,will some ground not get planted this year.wonder if the trade is missing this.I don't think traders understand how much money farmers are losing right now.I don't think we'll see an increase in acres this year.

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        • #5
          There is currently land for rent in my area. I'm not interested. I'm sure the LL and tenant will get together before planting time.There is a lot going back, or not coming out of CRP in my area.

          You're correct steffy, there will be NO increase in planted acres. And the acres planted will not have the money spent on them to produce another record yield regardless of weather.

          edit to add the word record
          Last edited by 82; 03-12-2016, 11:43 AM.

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          • #6
            Here to, had 2 guys call. their current tenants dropped them. They called me figuring I would rent it. told them the price was to high. they seemed disappointed I didn't want it. they didin't want to lower the rent. I agree 82, seems everyone I talk to are going to put bare minimum inputs
            we dropped 140 acres, also. it was marginal land. need to get pretty picky on the land you rent now days.

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            • #7
              I can not drop my "marginal land." That's all that I own. I also get to spend more on herbicides than I ever have because of waterhemp. Strangely, I guess, I'm optimistic that i will make money on the corn ground at least.

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              • #8
                Are you putting down more or less fertilizer Ff, it's what plants crave.

                Here, even though fertilizer cost's are down slightly/lbs., people are putting on less lbs./acre.

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                • #9
                  FF, there are 2 differences between DUKE and your comments; 1, you are talking about land you own, while DUKE is talking about land to lease; and 2, you are being optimistic vs. Duke being realistic. Smart farmers know when to call the vet, or when to shoot her.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by The Duke View Post
                    Here to, had 2 guys call. their current tenants dropped them. They called me figuring I would rent it. told them the price was to high. they seemed disappointed I didn't want it. they didin't want to lower the rent. I agree 82, seems everyone I talk to are going to put bare minimum inputs
                    we dropped 140 acres, also. it was marginal land. need to get pretty picky on the land you rent now days.
                    Interesting, I suppose that is the way a crop farmer 'culls the herd' so to speak i.e. culling out the low producing fields that yield below the marginal cost of production. So you have several choices, landlord drops the rent, reduce input costs, or magically improve yields. If I was in your neighborhood I would probably troll it out and make native hay to feed my heifers/dry cows from the fallow fields and pay the few bucks a bale to the stubborn land owners that refuse to drop rent but still need cash to pay their taxes in Aug lol. But wait, I already do that here :-)

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                    • #11
                      Oh no no...lol....just plant alfalfa and turn on the electricity-for water...here comes alfalfa for the udders...


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                      • #12
                        Well geez dennis why didn't I think of that. the problem with that is all the big dairies grow there own haylage. try baling hay in Wi when it rains all the time, getting it baled is near impossible and thsts all do all summer. the ones that want to buy baled hay are the one's that are a little short on cash.

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                        • #13
                          Alfalfa? Not me, haven't fed it in over 2 years and it won't grow here. Cows have been on an all silage diet for a long time, just have to chop your corn silage right. Going to start green chopping some random fields next week, seems the row crop guys like it when their cover crop and its moisture is hauled off by the ton instead of having to spend the hp working it down and drying out.

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                          • #14
                            I haven't heard that in my immediate area...I'm south of Duke by a bit. Here, most anything gets scooped up immediately it seems and few people walk away from leases. I'm trying to land a long term lease on about 400 ac for a special project of mine but I don't imagine it will be cheap...

                            I do know someone east of me about 40 minutes that had a neighboring farmer walk away from a little over 200 ac because the rent was too high. The landholder went to all the surrounding people to try and find someone to rent for that same price (it was crazy high)... no takers at that price. I heard they ended up dropping rent by 25% before anyone would take it.
                            [URL="http://www.facebook.com/DiederichFarm"]DiederichFarm[/URL]
                            "You are only as good as your next success, not your last" Sir Jock Stirrup

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                            • #15
                              82, I'm planning on shaving fertilizer amounts only ever so slightly. My only big input savings is conventional corn. I do think I have a good chance to make money on the corn, but not the beans,
                              Yes, Percy, I pretty much agree with you. I'm lucky that my landlords are also my siblings and we get along well. Their ground is also better than mine (thank goodness).

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