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Will you try Enlist corn and soybeans next spring?

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  • Will you try Enlist corn and soybeans next spring?

    The USDA approved Dow's "Enlist" corn and soybean seeds, which are resistant to 2,4-D. Still needed, though: EPA's approval for the Enlist Duo herbicide, although company expects approval in time for 2015.
    "Enlist will be a very effective solution and we’re pleased to have this technology one step closer to the farmgate."
    (You can read the full story at http://www.agweb.com/article/enlist_...A_Alison_Rice/, which also has links to the USDA approval documents.)

    Anyone considering Enlist for their fields? Will it solve your weed problem? Let us know.

  • #2
    the answer is YES us here in the south are some of the first to have RR problem weeds they are real bad in spots nothing will kill them if they get over 4 inches tall 24d will be a welcome glycosophate for the grass a winner---------------------------------dave

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    • #3
      I just hope everyone follows the label in an effort to make it a long lasting herbicide seed combination for years to come.

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      • #4
        USDA deregulates Dow’s Enlist corn, soybean traits






        Sep 18, 2014 Farm Press Staff | Southeast Farm Press




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        • With the USDA action, the ball now goes to the Environmental Protection Agency for registration of Enlist Duo herbicide, the companion herbicide to the Enlist traits. Approval for Enlist Duo is expected in the near future.
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        This week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture decided to deregulate Dow AgroSciences’ Enlist corn and soybean traits in the United States.

        With the USDA action, the ball now goes to the Environmental Protection Agency for registration of Enlist Duo herbicide, the companion herbicide to the Enlist traits. Approval for Enlist Duo is expected in the near future.

        The Enlist traits are part of the Enlist Weed Control System, a new trait and herbicide technology. USDA’s decision applies to the Enlist corn, Enlist soybean and Enlist E3 soybean traits. Enlist E3 soybeans are being developed through a collaboration between MS Technologies and Dow AgroSciences.

        Resistant weeds more than doubled since 2009 and infest approximately 70 million acres of American farmland, challenging farmers’ ability to raise a healthy crop. “Enlist will help farmers increase their productivity to meet the growing demand for a safe and affordable food supply,” said Tim Hassinger, president, Dow AgroSciences. “We’ve used the latest science and technology to address problem weeds. Enlist will be a very effective solution and we’re pleased to have this technology one step closer to the farmgate.”

        “America’s soybean farmers welcome (the) decision by USDA to deregulate Enlist Duo. As the problem of weed resistance spreads across the soybean growing regions of the U.S., this solution presents another integral mode of action with which farmers can fight yield-robbing weeds,” said American Soybean Association President and Iowa farmer Ray Gaesser. “USDA deserves a great deal of credit for recognizing delays in the biotech approvals process and working to address them. Our attention now shifts to final EPA registration of the Enlist Duo herbicide, and to approvals in key soybean export markets. For new tools like Enlist Duo to be implemented and realized, we need to have approvals in key U.S. soy export markets since approximately 60 percent of the U.S. soy crop is exported.”

        “Gaining approval for this important technology has been a long, hard fought battle,” said NCGA Trade Policy and Biotechnology Action Team Chair Jim Zimmerman, a farmer from Rosendale, Wis. “It is important that farmers continue to gain access to the tools that they need in the field through a science-based, timely regulatory system. We look forward to similar results for other herbicide systems in the future.”

        Commercial intentions for Enlist in 2015 will be provided after the EPA has issued its decision on Enlist Duo herbicide.

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        • #5
          Real-world herbicide resistance very complex issue




          'A wicked problem'



          Sep 17, 2014 Ford Baldwin | Delta Farm Press




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          pigweed


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          Multiple resistance could be a nightmare for region's farmers

          I recently returned from the Herbicide Summit II in Washington. The first summit was held two years ago, and after it I expressed disappointment in that meeting. This year’s meeting, however, deserves high compliments. It was a dramatic turnaround and improvement over the first. From beginning to end, it was the best group of speakers I have heard in a long time. Of course, someone can give an excellent presentation and not say anything. While a couple of speakers missed the mark for me, overall the content was very good.

          Herbicide resistance management in the real world is a very complex issue. The speakers failed to address some of those issues, but in fairness I am not sure how one would address them. The main thing I took home from the meeting was our key leadership in both the Weed Science Society of America and within various federal agencies in Washington finally “get it” when it comes to the threat this issue poses to agriculture globally.

          I was extremely pleased that the meeting did not turn into a finger pointing or gripe session, and that all of the blame was not directed toward the farmer.

          One of the first talks dealt with Understanding the Decision Making Process. The speaker was arenowned social scientist and an excellent presenter. You don’t have to know me very well to know sociology is not my cup of tea. Thankfully we are not all alike and it is good that some are thinking differently about this issue — differently than I do.


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          »What’s next in herbicide-tolerant crops?

          The sociologist described herbicide resistance management (HRM) as a “wicked problem.” I certainly had to agree with him on that. It is nice that a scientist outside of agriculture can see that simple fixes such as just switching to the next new trait is not going to solve the problem. He dealt with a lot of interesting aspects of the holistic approach that will be required for success. However, when you move to the real world, providers of the next new traits are going to put a lot of the components of a holistic approach into a box.

          As I have stated frequently, marketing managers in chemical and seed companies will be the ones that determine where our weed management programs are heading. While I sure did not know everyone in attendance at the summit, it appeared that marketing managers were conspicuously absent. Research scientists in both the public and private sectors generally agree on the science involved in resistance management. However, much of the science gets lost in marketing. Marketing folks get rewarded for what they sell this year — not for having a nice five-year holistic plan.

          I believe it will take several more years to fully realize all potential impacts of the shift of weed control dollars from herbicides to seed traits.

          One thing everyone would agree on is the registration and approval process for new trait technologies is happening much slower than we had hoped. Every time you hear a company person reporting on a particular new trait, the anticipated approval dates are pushed back even further. The desired stacks with some of these traits seem to be getting pushed back further than that. That presents the dilemma that if the companies cannot work together to promote diversity among the trait technologies, all could ultimately fail prematurely. That means the rewards system for marketing folks may have to change.

          A clod-kicking weed scientist sure does not know where to begin to tackle an issue of that magnitude. Perhaps our social science community can. The speaker did not go there , because it was not the right time and place. However, he acknowledged it is a major issue — another reason HRM is a “wicked problem.”

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          • #6
            I'm leery of it because of cotton's extreme sensitivity to 2,4-d. I'm not yet convinced that they have totally solved the volatility problem. I guess we will find out next year...

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            • #7
              We have been spraying 24- d every year for quite a few years. We have grapes growing on the fences. It appears either we have 24-d resistant grapes or the drift is next to nothing. Years ago we could drive the sprayer past a grape on the way to the field and kill it.

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              • #8
                I have used 24DB iadave for years the lable says not to spray over the top at any rate we have done this for years with no ill effects it will take out six inch high pig weeds but anything over that it will hurt but not kill 24db is a old herbicide from back in the late 70s and still used here so beans do have some natural reistance-----------------------------dave

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