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  • Sds alert

    SDS has found its way into our beans. With this wet August it has shown it's ugly head. Our beans are far enough along, but I feel yields may be affected in the 10% to 20% area. Our later beans would be the higher %. Not good, for these beans looked like 65 to 75 bu. So much for high yields in our area.

  • #2
    Greg1 where are you located? We have it here in Saline county in Missouri also. It isn't spotty like in years past. In most places the whole field is beginning to yellow. I'm curious if it is a National problem or just isolated areas.

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    • #3
      We are seeing LOTS of fields with white mold here in C IL.
      Last edited by farmnwife; 08-28-2014, 10:09 AM.
      Judi
      raising corn, beans, cattle & kids in the middle of the Midwest
      Keeping an eye on it all with my quad copter.
      [url]http://FarmInFocus.com[/url]

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      • #4
        I heard the whole field yellowing in ind & ill was from the crop being mature not sds,seems early to me but since I'm not from there hve no idea,whats the real truth

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        • #5
          Steffy - I would have to agree - the ones I see turning here are 2.8 or 3.2 's planted last week or April - first week of May - I would say mine are at least 30 days from cutting - stays wet it will be the first week of Oct. .

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          • #6
            when would those maturity bean normally start to turn

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            • #7
              There is definitely SDS here. 3.2 3.6 and 3.8 beans here are turning that were planted in late April and early May...but that is because they are getting ripe, not many here planted that early. It is really rearing it's ugly head in the mid-late May beans where it will effect yield IMO. I should be cutting my 3.6 - 3.8s now....and they've just now hinted at turning. We're 3-4 weeks behind normal maturing, even with all the heat. High Humidity and showers every other day is making diseases explode.

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              • #8
                These areas I'm looking at are low lying and with the wet conditions this spring and throughout the growing season we are seeing more of this disease than before. I know its SDS because of the lower leaves showing the brown spotchy discoloration with the green veins standing out in the leaf. I've talked to my Pioneer dealer and he pretty much said Yep, everybody has it around these parts this year and with the heavy Aug rains this year we are seeing it more. Some hybrids are more prone to get it than others.

                My beans were planted May 9 thru May 18. Normally I wouldn't see yellow leaves until Sept 10 or so. Harvest is usually the first week of Oct. Since the disease attacks the roots I figure what pod fill I have in those areas is all I'm going to get. I've looked at some of my later beans and they have the disease too. I'm afraid the upper pods on those plants will not fill. Time will tell. The good thing right now is the hot dry spell we seem to be in. It hasn't rained for 2 days. This will slow down the SDS I hope.

                I'm in southwest Ohio, se in mid- mo

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                • #9
                  everything will on lock down shortly, shorter days do it plain and simple. Hard to except when we all feel we haven't even had summer yet.My early beans are turning.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by steffy View Post
                    when would those maturity bean normally start to turn
                    In my neck of the woods it appears like our beans are at least a week behind normal. 28 relative maturity is sometimes ready to cut in the 3rd week of Sept but they are just starting to show a bit of yellow when planted the week ahead of Mother's Day.

                    Here there is both some white mold and some SDS. You have to work to find these diseases in some fields and in some fields it is easily spotted from the road.
                    “Democracy is the worst form of government, -------------------------------except for all the others.”

                    ― Winston S. Churchill

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                    • #11
                      White mold could have been suppressed with Cobra. SDS and SCN go hand in hand. That's the bad thing about cutting back corn acres and planting more SB. Your only defense is to pick varieties with BOTH high resistance to SDS and SCN. Plant feed instead of corn if you have a market. Go to a SB-W-C rotation but don't plant W after C. The fusarium from the C will wipe the W out on scab.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by steffy View Post
                        when would those maturity bean normally start to turn
                        I would have to agree with jabber - we are probably a good week to 10 behind the norm - what ever norm is - we have cut here as early as Labor Day to the first week of Oct. - I guess norm would be the second to third week of Sept.

                        Calling for 1-3 inchs the next few days

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                        • #13
                          Is this SDS? Never had any experience with it.



                          It's the only area I've found, it follows a tile line, weird.



                          If it hadn't been for the pythium on both sides of the tile line the SDS area would have been a little larger. Might have to consider 10' centers on the tile lines to help with the pythium problem...wonder if that would make the SDS problem worse? I give up.

                          These are a 2.1 maturity bean, which is considered a really full season bean up here, planted May 24th, which is also considered kind of late planting for a 2.1.

                          We had 1.6" of rain over the last couple days, don't know if the rain, and cool helps or hurts me at this stage of the game. Time will tell.

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                          • #14
                            82: Go to the Pioneer Growing Point website for excellent disease photos. I DKJ about tile, but it seems reasonable. The water drains TO the tile and concentrates there until it can get out. SDS often occurs in circular patches in a field and then spreads. Make sure you rotate out of SB next year. And, make sure you pick varieties with high resistance to SDS and SCN...they go hand in hand. The bad news is there is only one or two SCN resistance genes...the last I knew.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by 82 View Post
                              Is this SDS? Never had any experience with it.



                              It's the only area I've found, it follows a tile line, weird.



                              If it hadn't been for the pythium on both sides of the tile line the SDS area would have been a little larger. Might have to consider 10' centers on the tile lines to help with the pythium problem...wonder if that would make the SDS problem worse? I give up.

                              These are a 2.1 maturity bean, which is considered a really full season bean up here, planted May 24th, which is also considered kind of late planting for a 2.1.

                              We had 1.6" of rain over the last couple days, don't know if the rain, and cool helps or hurts me at this stage of the game. Time will tell.
                              Your first picture shows SDS. We have seen some really hot days lately and I think this has helped slow it down. More rain tonite and the next couple of days. I don't think that is good but if the beans are hanging in there then moisture could help fill those pods. My later beans are still filling and looking good even though the disease is present. This disease is new for us but I'm not sure we didn't have it before this year and didn't know it. I hate the thought of this soil prone disease and no resistance. From what I've read there are no soybeans resistant except some are more resistant than others. Not good.

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