Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

20" corn rows, VS. 30" corn

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 20" corn rows, VS. 30" corn

    I currently plant corn in 30" rows, but I'm tinkering with the idea of switching to 20" corn. Do any of you have any experience with 20" corn? What yield increase if any have you seen? what plant pop. do you plant in 20" corn, I currently plant 36000 pop. in 30" rows. What are the disadvantages of 20" row corn? My farm is located in west central Indiana. I think I can use my current Case IH planter and slide the rows in to 20" and add a few rows. A different corn head will be my largest expense, I currently have a john Deere 643 corn head. Thank you in advance for your input.

  • #2
    you will gain a little on yeald and gain on shade and weed control you will have to move your wheels out to 40s and reset your spray rig I would cut the pop back to 33 34 unless you irrgate may be 30 even give you bigger ears the head is the biggest problem not many around most 20s will be north west of you I would find the head before I planted-------------------dave

    Comment


    • #3
      My 20 inch row experience consisted of two neighbors in 20's. I'm not sure what kind of yields they are getting. What I have noticed is that their corn is about a foot taller than mine. Stand ability seems to be a issue. I have seen some train wrecks while mine was still standing pretty good right next to it.

      Comment


      • #4
        tf, If you ask 479, I think he can tell you a couple companies that make the corn heads for 20, 22 and even 15. The two names
        I have seen escape me right now, yes, the head will be quite an expense. IF I was in corn country, I'd still try what we tried here
        several years ago...when we had the moisture to begin with, to start dry land corn...twin row, and then the 30 inch head will
        still work..just a suggestion. Okay, it looked terrible, but the yield made up for the ribbing I got all season before harvest. I
        hope we get a soil moisture profile good enough that I can brave that "act" again, just to see if it was a fluk.

        Comment


        • #5
          Tractor house has 28 John Deere 12 row 20 inch headers. Calmers has made 15" headers for years and now offers a 12" head.

          I would plant higher populations in narrower rows. Equidistant plant spacing(same distance between rows and in rows) would represent the most efficient use of water sunlight and nutrients.
          Last edited by jb197; 10-23-2013, 09:35 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            We have been on 20" rows now for 5 years. We built a 12 row 20" planter from an 8 row 30" JD 7100. We also built a 12 row 20" cornhead for our JD 9500 combine. Up here in Central MN, we are seeing yield increases of up to 10-15% and corn silage yields greater than that. Stalk strength issues have never been a concren for us after we switched to Monsanto hybrids and got Pioneer and Mycogen out of our seed lineup. The further south you are, the less yield increase you will likely see. Weed control is easy, usually a pre-emerge like SURESTART right after planting and come back with glyphosate, but don't always need to. Soybeans, just one pass with Glyphosate and Grass Herb. I wouldn't change your plant pops much but this should be based on your soil's water holding capacity and CEC.

            Comment


            • #7
              The one aspect no one talks about in 20" rows is heat release from the interior of the field. In northern climates inter row heat is less of a problem . As you go south heat entrapment becomes more of a problem lowering yields. The cool climate and surprising good yields this year are an example of that phenomenon. In the western and far southern areas 38" corn rows are much more common as yield increases from 30" rows are less dependable or significant.
              I have a friend planting 35000 in 38" rows and yielding equally with 30" neighbors.
              Corn needs room to breath, heat causes stomata on leaf surfaces to stay closed longer during the day , reducing CO2 intake and O2 release during periods of sunlight when photosynthesis is taking place. In the absence of sunlight (night) respiration continues at a higher rate in higher temp. environments. R7

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by roger7 View Post
                The one aspect no one talks about in 20" rows is heat release from the interior of the field. In northern climates inter row heat is less of a problem . As you go south heat entrapment becomes more of a problem lowering yields. The cool climate and surprising good yields this year are an example of that phenomenon. In the western and far southern areas 38" corn rows are much more common as yield increases from 30" rows are less dependable or significant.
                I have a friend planting 35000 in 38" rows and yielding equally with 30" neighbors.
                Corn needs room to breath, heat causes stomata on leaf surfaces to stay closed longer during the day , reducing CO2 intake and O2 release during periods of sunlight when photosynthesis is taking place. In the absence of sunlight (night) respiration continues at a higher rate in higher temp. environments. R7
                roger7,

                Also along that same line, have you been able to find anything with direction of rows...as far as sunlight and prevailing breezes?

                Comment


                • #9
                  In the mid corn belt to switch to 20" rows you have to consider-
                  - the heat entrapment above
                  - the issue that a canopy that is quicker to close densely may collect more sunlight and better shades the soil but also is a better environment for leaf disease
                  - whether you can simply get similar results by finetuning population.

                  paraphrasing some thoughts sharer by Emerson Nafzinger of the Univ of Ill in Urbana Ill-
                  We aren't getting an increase for row spacing narrower that 30" unless we increase plant populations. If we increase plant populations in 30" rows to the same as 20" rows we are getting the same yield response.

                  IMHO, From research I have read, I am guessing in Illinois and Indiana only those who choose their corn hybrids for high densities (stress tolerance, disease resistance, strong stalks/roots) successfully plant very high populations, and aggressively manage disease risks will get a significant long term return from 20" row corn. As corn hybrids continue to change, the economic rewards for further narrowing corn rows might change in the mid corn belt. At the present time, it is hard to find replicated research that suggests that we go to 20" rows in this region.
                  “Democracy is the worst form of government, -------------------------------except for all the others.”

                  ― Winston S. Churchill

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Finding a hybrid that'll flex seems to be where its at. Lowering the same hybrid from 33,000 to 30,000 gives us better standability, and more double ears, and a higher energy corn silage. There is always lotsa seed looking for a home that 'just as good as' , or 'its really the same thing in a different bag'! Cold tolerant, rapid emergence...thats where I start, cuz if you don't show up on time, you'll NEVER get to hear the fat lady sing.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Doomund View Post
                      We have been on 20" rows now for 5 years. We built a 12 row 20" planter from an 8 row 30" JD 7100. We also built a 12 row 20" cornhead for our JD 9500 combine. Up here in Central MN, we are seeing yield increases of up to 10-15% and corn silage yields greater than that. Stalk strength issues have never been a concren for us after we switched to Monsanto hybrids and got Pioneer and Mycogen out of our seed lineup. The further south you are, the less yield increase you will likely see. Weed control is easy, usually a pre-emerge like SURESTART right after planting and come back with glyphosate, but don't always need to. Soybeans, just one pass with Glyphosate and Grass Herb. I wouldn't change your plant pops much but this should be based on your soil's water holding capacity and CEC.
                      Hey Doomund, sounds like you got your corn head put together. Did you have to buy poly snoots from GVL or some other mfg like them, or did you have steel snoots you could re-work? Does the 9500 handle the new head OK? How are your crops yielding? I'm in one of the NOT better than expected parts of MN this year. We had plenty of rain, the timing of those rains just really sucked this year.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        dennis1, I don't know of any studies that resolved that question about row orientation and prevailing wind direction. My feeling is , it don't make any difference. Stand density and ambient temperature seem more important as narrow row usage seems to decline as you move closer toward the equator. R7

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          82, yep the 9500 handles the cornhead fine. We put fluid in the back tires and that REALLY stabilized the machine. It is a 1995 model so it is already reinforced underneath compared to the earlier models. Put on GVL poly snouts. I took my drought plot off last week (sandy soils) and it went from 87 to 101 bushels per acre, with Gold Country Seed 95-33 winning. Yields are poor in central MN this year due to dry conditions but especially the cold July and wet spring. We had 1.13" of rain total from June 21-September 8th.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Percy I agree with you. These regional seed compnies from Monsanto are as good or better than Dekalb, for example. These companies can sell seed that "fits" there given region. I buy almost exclusively from regional seed companies here in MN.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Kinda mind boggling when Yield Pop is posting results for 750 different hybrids!!! Some of what we chopped this year woulda been 300 corn, but you wouldn't have liked it, cuz it was 12 feet tall, too.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X