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  • #16
    Originally posted by dennis1 View Post
    speaking of older combines, slugged the 8820 late afternoon yesterday...first time since Oct 10, 1997....I remember that date,
    first grand daughter was born the same day I slugged it...in corn...took another day of digging to get it cleared...and built a wrench
    for the cylinder...laying on a perlin in the shop, it's heavy, BUT since I was in milo, was able to release the concaves about 38 turns
    and was able to walk the slug out in just a couple pushes and tugs....finding out that a flex head works great picking up down
    milo...if you can run into and across...wondering what that might do in corn? Milo stalks look like soybean fields where we
    are having to clean it to the ground...stalks are still plenty wet...I'm hoping that's the real reason for the slug.
    Dennis: IMHO a 8820 is a far better combine than a 9600. But, if you're going to run antiques, you should at least do like me and upgrade to a 1680 with a long separator. Seldom slugs but on the rare occasion that it has, you just drop the concaves and bump it out. When you slug a cylinder, you're screwed. Been there. Done that with my old MF850. lol.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by 48 View Post
      r3020: First off, you have to get corn planted EARLY...the last week of April. You plant silage corns late on purpose to make them grow tall.

      jabber: Plant HEIGHT does not correlate to grain yield. It does correlate to SILAGE yield. Most modern hybrids have 21 leaves. The leaves are the the carbohydrate factory...not the stalks. If you have upright...pineapple...leaves, they will let in more sunlight (weeds love this too, lol). If you have big, wide leaves, you have a bigger factory. The problem is that breeders breed DUAL PURPOSE...SILAGE and grain. The first thing I do when picking a hybrid is look at the SILAGE section of the catalog to see if it is listed there too. That doesn't automatically rule it out, but if I can find a shorter corn with good yield and health, I will take it every time over a tall silage corn.
      I wish it were that simple. Since we only want silage, that is what we select for. My favorites will set low ears, and put leaves on above ear later.I love the 2nd ear..grain guys wouldn't, cuz its usually later, and not a great full kernal producer. STRONG GROUND makes a big difference, regardless of variety. RAPID EMERGENCE plays a big role in silage corn, and I think it programs itself to what it will end up being-early on. The more genetic crosses you get, the more variables you have---and more potential.

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      • #18
        One thing is certain: later plant corn, the same seed , the same soil, will be a lot higher.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by 48 View Post
          r3020: First off, you have to get corn planted EARLY...the last week of April. You plant silage corns late on purpose to make them grow tall.

          jabber: Plant HEIGHT does not correlate to grain yield. It does correlate to SILAGE yield. Most modern hybrids have 21 leaves. The leaves are the the carbohydrate factory...not the stalks. If you have upright...pineapple...leaves, they will let in more sunlight (weeds love this too, lol). If you have big, wide leaves, you have a bigger factory. The problem is that breeders breed DUAL PURPOSE...SILAGE and grain. The first thing I do when picking a hybrid is look at the SILAGE section of the catalog to see if it is listed there too. That doesn't automatically rule it out, but if I can find a shorter corn with good yield and health, I will take it every time over a tall silage corn.
          IMHO- right and wrong. Height does not always = yield- Buuuuuuuuuuttttt- Iffffffff higher corn yields were not the result in some taller hybrids, we would not have ANY tall hybrids on commercial #2 yellow corn acres. Plant breeders can't simply choose for shorter stalks without a risk of yield reduction in SOME high performing inbred crosses. Due to the fact that harvestable yield is the number one characteristic that most farm operators look for, the seed industry will continue to produce some hybrids that are taller than we would prefer.

          On the leaf angle and size thing- other than commercial nitrogen, the number one reason for yield increases in the nations corn is ever higher yielding hybrid seed corn. The easiest way for breeders to have accomplished this ended up being through selecting for plants that would stand higher densities (higher populations). The plants that stand higher populations typically have leaves that are smaller and more erect than the landraces or the early hybrids. Modern hybrids will yield about the same as the earlier generations planted at the prevailing populations of those times. At todays populations, the prior generations can't typically stand the density and the yields are typically capped near the yields for prior decades(or most often the prior generations blow up due to disease pressure and an inability to stand at higher populations).

          Anyone who has walked a corn field at mature height would notice that when in a taller hybrid, there is typically less sunlight that hits the soil. Every ounce of sunlight that hits a leaf is an opportunity for photosynthesis. Every ray of sunlight that hits the soil is an opportunity for more evaportation and hotter soil.

          I prefer hybrids that are more modest in height, but my preference for plant height is a lesser priority than harvestable yield. Of the hybrids that I planted this year, I only consider one the ideal height. The rest are taller than I would prefer. I was fortunate. All of them stood well except for a very few small pockets.
          Last edited by jabber1; 10-29-2011, 07:55 AM.
          “Democracy is the worst form of government, -------------------------------except for all the others.”

          ― Winston S. Churchill

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          • #20
            This is a little off topic, but I ate supper Thursday night at a Chineese resturant in St. Louis. Looking at the ears of corn that came in my seafood delight made me wonder if they came from Ken's farm that is gravel. They were filled nicely, but only 1 1/2" to 2" long, lmao!

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