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Iowa55
10-04-2012, 01:02 PM
Way to go ses. Many of you saw the Picts of the new all steel building ses is putting up. NOT just a package but built from scratch, rafters the whole deal from raw steel. Nice size too. Hope ses will post a few of them.

Any way great looking so far.

ATTA BOY

ses
10-04-2012, 07:00 PM
Here's a pic of the shop we're building, I hope. Gotta do the one at a time I guess. Anyhow.....

http://i50.tinypic.com/2n0kkrp.jpg

This is us just getting started. It's 60X100X18. We built everything from raw steel like 55 said. Just my son, my wife some (quite a bit), and I. Gonna take a while.

ses
10-04-2012, 07:04 PM
http://i48.tinypic.com/351er2p.jpg

This is the second picture.

ses
10-04-2012, 07:07 PM
http://i50.tinypic.com/nco0lg.jpg

This is the final product. We're going to cover the sides with tar paper and tie some of those blue tarps down for a roof and call it good.

Ghost Ryder
10-04-2012, 08:11 PM
Wow!!! Very nice!! Worth a trip down to visit sometime!

johndeere-girl
10-04-2012, 08:16 PM
Nice job ses. It make you feel good to build from scratch like that. About 12 years ago we lossed our barn in a wind storm and rebuilt a Milking parlor and a 70 x 160 freestall barn, and that was not a packages deal. We did all the work, with help from some friends. One day I'll try to post pictures.

Great Job..Keep the pictures coming.

jabber1
10-04-2012, 08:24 PM
Wow, I didn't know you had the willpower and talent to get that big project done. Maybe you can have an all Ag Web party the day you want to hang the tarp.

That looks like it will be a great building.

ses
10-04-2012, 08:48 PM
Wow, I didn't know you had the willpower and talent to get that big project done. Maybe you can have an all Ag Web party the day you want to hang the tarp.

That looks like it will be a great building.

Jabber Kiss my butt.

If'n yalls will stare at the last picture and the rafter closest to you, stuck your thumb up yous azz while whistling Dixie backwards while at the same time holding your tongue just right you'll notice some upward notches in the end rafter. That's where we're gonna put the end columns before we hang the door. Soon's we get that done we're gonna tarpaper it.

48
10-04-2012, 11:30 PM
ses: Nice job but I don't think you made it strong enough. JK. Will prolly be the designated bomb shelter for your county.

davidm479
10-04-2012, 11:35 PM
you putting a concert floor on that that you could doubble it as a skatrink------ how about a bifold door that make her look classy-------------------dave

verbatime
10-05-2012, 06:20 AM
Ses, it looks real nice but if you don't gets some cross bracing on that thing before a high wind it's going to domino on ya and fold like an accordion. Believe it or not it causes more turbulence with out the shell.

Sorry but I'd hate to see you lose it... and you better get a small construction policy from your insurance company... it won't cost you much. And if OSHA catches you in that man boom like that again with no tether or harness you'll be fined out of business.

Other than that it appears you are brilliant and may just be a genius.

ses
10-05-2012, 06:32 AM
Ses, it looks real nice but if you don't gets some cross bracing on that thing before a high wind it's going to domino on ya and fold like an accordion. Believe it or not it causes more turbulence with out the shell.

Sorry but I'd hate to see you lose it... and you better get a small construction policy from your insurance company... it won't cost you much. And if OSHA catches you in that man boom like that again with no tether or harness you'll be fined out of business.

Other than that it appears you are brilliant and may just be a genius.

Verb, we did brace it with cable after we took the pictures. I didn't realize you couldn't use a man cage on their telehandler until I was ready to send it back and asked the guy if they had one to use. Live and learn I guess. I'll check on the insurance. Thanks for the input.

verbatime
10-05-2012, 06:42 AM
I should have known you braced it.... good job.

48
10-05-2012, 12:07 PM
you putting a concert floor on that that you could doubble it as a skatrink------ how about a bifold door that make her look classy-------------------dave

Dave: All the bi-fold doors in this area blew off years ago. Plus, can't get the combine in.

dennis1
10-06-2012, 07:08 AM
ses looked at a few bi-folds...saw him at an auction once, the time he Mexican style hauled 4 tractor tires and dual rims stacked
4 high on his pu back to my place on his way home...he can build the single hydraulic door himself...as long as he doesn't
use JD hydraulic cylinders that have the inside retaining ring. Found out the insurance on a fully enclosed building is less
that when they are open sided or ended...and I asked about using tarps for the doors...not for the insurance break. I tried.

GREAT JOB ses!

ses
10-06-2012, 07:26 AM
That guy had a very nice droll over kinda shop.

Kinda thinking about a door kinda like this one.

http://www.hpdoors.com/standalonedoor.asp

davidm479
10-06-2012, 07:36 AM
18 foot should yeald at least a 16 foot hole with door 9600 should be around 15 foot I know a 8820 is 14 foot because I put mine in a 14x14 hole still going to be nice building -----------------------dave

verbatime
10-06-2012, 08:06 AM
That guy had a very nice droll over kinda shop.

Kinda thinking about a door kinda like this one.

http://www.hpdoors.com/standalonedoor.asp

I'd say there is not only a slab but a pretty substantial footer with plenty of steel in it.

ses
10-06-2012, 09:01 AM
I'd say there is not only a slab but a pretty substantial footer with plenty of steel in it.

I'd say you're right.

I think it was Dave 479 who said a while back to put a railroad rail in the cement where the door was going to come down so I bought a rail this summer off of Nextech ads. That's why we don't have the columns up for the door way yet, we think they need beefed up and then a jitt load of cement to hold them up.

dennis1
10-06-2012, 11:07 AM
Plan for hell for stout..those weak points are haunting.

btw...ses, slip by and I'll show you the airplane hanger door south of us 3 miles....doesn't have the top track, just a major
hinge/shaft/bearing/bracket inside the door frame..can get some info as to the cement and specs they used if you want,
just for reference.

Local crop duster, so he probably won't be opening and closing when the winds are 30+ mph..

verbatime
10-06-2012, 12:44 PM
Ses, rememeber those big hanger doors at the McCook airbase... those still work easy by hand and roll on a rail.

ses
10-06-2012, 01:34 PM
Dennis, I'll give you a holler in a few days and we'll run down and look, maybe after harvest if it freezes tonight. I'm thinking we're gonna fish plate the I beam on both sides before we go up with the columns. I know you sent an email about the company at Russel making doors. I'll check it out .

Verb I remember the doors at the base....kinda sorta. They rolled on a track like a barn door right?

davidm479
10-06-2012, 08:26 PM
I'd say you're right.

I think it was Dave 479 who said a while back to put a railroad rail in the cement where the door was going to come down so I bought a rail this summer off of Nextech ads. That's why we don't have the columns up for the door way yet, we think they need beefed up and then a jitt load of cement to hold them up.

thats right ses when I built my shop I used a small railroad track rail buried half in cement as the bottom guide for the door it works great also when I pored my floor I used a thirty foot piece of regular railroad iron put a big clevis on each end and put it down a foot in cement for tie downs to streighen frames and thing use" em all the time----------------------------dave

jabber1
10-07-2012, 06:09 AM
thats right ses when I built my shop I used a small railroad track rail buried half in cement as the bottom guide for the door it works great also when I pored my floor I used a thirty foot piece of regular railroad iron put a big clevis on each end and put it down a foot in cement for tie downs to streighen frames and thing use" em all the time----------------------------dave

Those heavy duty tied downs are a great idea. A local machine shop has them poured into their floor. They call them a "dead man" ?????????? You can do a lot of heavy duty straightening with tie downs poured in the floor, some chain, and hydraulic jacks.

jabber1
10-07-2012, 06:22 AM
thats right ses when I built my shop I used a small railroad track rail buried half in cement as the bottom guide for the door it works great also when I pored my floor I used a thirty foot piece of regular railroad iron put a big clevis on each end and put it down a foot in cement for tie downs to streighen frames and thing use" em all the time----------------------------dave

Dave, did you pour the rail in the floor just like it is laid on the track with the top of the rail resting against the inside of the bottom of the door or did you put the rail in edgewise to provide a channel for the inside and outside of the door????????????

I am afraid that the RR track rail placed edgewise andpoured in the floor for sliding door guides wouldn't work so well in an Illinois winter. I think it will fill up with snow that melts to solid ice when the sun hits the snow at side of the shed.

Here most guys pour the floor inside the door just above the lower edge of the door with a small drop down to the apron a bit below the door. Some put an angle iron on the raised edge and some don't.

I have heard of a few sheds in Indiana where the inside pad and the apron are both the same height with a gap between the slabs just a bit wider than the bottom of the sliding door. The notch in between is wide open all of the way to the bottom of the two slabs. The idea is that the slabs are door guides, instead of a small step down the slabs are the same height with just a gap (smoother to cross for things like a fork lift). Because the gap between the doors is open- the doors are less likely to freeze down. Have any of you seen this approach for pouring concrete on each side of sliding shed doors to reduce freezing down of the doors and making less of a bump????????????

davidm479
10-07-2012, 07:35 AM
no jabber rail side up have no water or snow problem the rail sticks up just enough to hold a channel on the bottom of the door from going side ways very little bump no problem at all---------------------------dave

ses
10-07-2012, 09:54 AM
I think the rails in the floor is a good idea too. I have read of guys cementing two spaced apart a few feet then they weld chain links to it where ever they are needed, then torch/grind the chain links off when they're done.

Jabber I have never seen a door like that but think that would work. Might be a problem with mud getting in the groove then freezing.

verbatime
10-07-2012, 03:03 PM
Dennis, I'll give you a holler in a few days and we'll run down and look, maybe after harvest if it freezes tonight. I'm thinking we're gonna fish plate the I beam on both sides before we go up with the columns. I know you sent an email about the company at Russel making doors. I'll check it out .

Verb I remember the doors at the base....kinda sorta. They rolled on a track like a barn door right?

The rails at the airbase were at the bottom.

verbatime
10-07-2012, 03:15 PM
look on page 45 of this pdf file... the doors run on a rail...
http://egov.ocgov.com/vgnfiles/ocgov/Clerk-Recorder/Docs/Archives/The_Tustin_Hangars.pdf

verbatime
10-07-2012, 03:21 PM
https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/486654_10151180655094438_867504086_n.jpg

dennis1
10-07-2012, 04:15 PM
IF ice build up on the rail...you could tie on both ends with a welder and do the same thing they do with frozen pipes...warm
it up. Guessing when it's that nasty, I'm staying inside the house if at all possible.. ;)

davidm479
10-08-2012, 12:13 AM
i"ll see if I can get a picture up tomorrow------------------dave

dennis1
10-12-2012, 08:04 PM
Today makes tomorrow Saturday! ;)