AgWeb Farm Journal Legacy Project Top Producer Dairy Today Beef Today Pro Farmer Ag Day TV US Farm Report MyMachinery.com Ultimate Farm Quest
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1
    Senior Member wheatfarmer is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Cheyenne, OK
    Posts
    225

    Double crop soybeans

    What is the best way to plant double crop irrigated soybeans behind irrigated wheat? With a no till drill or a no till planter? Any other advise?

  2. #2
    Senior Member lafarmer345 is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Loozeana
    Posts
    1,668
    The first thing I would ask is are you furrow irrigating or overhead irrigaing?
    Most irrigation here is furrow on 38-40" rows. There are a few guys that I have seen taking half of the gangs off of their hippers or middle busters(there are also some one pass tillage tools that do this) and are making a wide bed...76-80". This will give you the weed contol benefits of drilled beans while still giving you a furrow to water down. I intend on planting my wheat on a raised wide bed this fall, assuming I can get back in the field after this hurricane, and will plant with a 1560 JD drill. I will follow the combine with the same drill with soybeans on this wide row. If you are watering with a center pivot, I defer to someone with more experience.

    Kevin

  3. #3
    Senior Member wheatfarmer is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Cheyenne, OK
    Posts
    225
    I am watering with a center pivot. I was thinking of planting roundup ready beans with a drill and I would have a set of tracks every 60 ft. where I run my sprayer. I had heard of sowing the beans to thick and would not produce; not any beans in this area.

  4. #4
    Senior Member lafarmer345 is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Loozeana
    Posts
    1,668
    I'm no expert sb farmer but the rule of thumb I have heard from "good" sb farmers is to increase population the later you get in the season as beans won't get as tall. Not sure what the optimal populaion # would be for your area.

  5. #5
    If you plant them to heavy they will likely
    go down and be hard to combine. North West
    IL I plant with a drill at 175000 but some
    go up to 225000.

  6. #6
    Senior Member BinswOH is on a distinguished road BinswOH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Montgomery County, Ohio
    Posts
    3,466
    I agree the only reason not to plant too thick is it creates weak plants that lay down easily. But if the second crop is not expected to make full height because of season length I'v seen recommendations to put em on a little heavier. I would check with other growers in your area and search the Oklahoma State ag department information. I think you might be in a zone that is more prevalent for "Rust" which should be considered with late season beans.

  7. #7
    Senior Member wheatfarmer is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Cheyenne, OK
    Posts
    225
    The beans should be in the ground by the 15th of June. Would that be considered late beans for midwestern Oklahoma?

  8. #8
    Senior Member BinswOH is on a distinguished road BinswOH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Montgomery County, Ohio
    Posts
    3,466
    We go a little later than that in Ohio. Here in SW part of state I see fewer try it since we seem to miss needed july showers too often. There on wheat field up the road from me and he only got about a 30% stand. Check with local experts! Are there any on here?

  9. #9
    Senior Member Myron Denny is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    443
    Wheatfarmer,I used a 7200 JD planter equipted for no-till.
    The beans we planted convential all look good, the beans I no-tilled in wheat stubble just about all died in the 100+ degree heat, the convential tilled beans wilted some but did not die.
    A neighbor no-till drilled in wheat stubble he got an excellant stand.
    We are not irrigated.

    Did you get your alfalfa sold?

  10. #10
    Senior Member wheatfarmer is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Cheyenne, OK
    Posts
    225
    I have a trucker who will take all the alfalfa at 160 to 170 ton when ever I am ready to start loading it. The beans I will no till after wheat will be irrigated on the ground I have rotated out of alfalfa. I have been trying to raise something on this irrigated ground that would make close to what alfala would. I have gotten use to having that second crop around and don't what to have only wheat.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
AgWeb Farm Journal Legacy Project Top Producer Dairy Today Beef Today Pro Farmer Ag Day TV US Farm Report MyMachinery.com Ultimate Farm Quest