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  1. #1
    Senior Member ECI is on a distinguished road ECI's Avatar
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    Long Silks ??????????????

    Good friend sent this to me this morning , So what are you seeing ?? You don't know ??? Well then damn it get off your azzes and take a look ! and report back lol ICF that means you to ! LMAO


    Long Silks?
    By Roger Elmore, Department of Agronomy
    Very hot days and warm night temperatures the last couple of weeks concern agronomists and corn growers. Unfortunately, this period of hot weather occurred during tasseling and silking. However, the USDA-NASS July 25th Iowa Crops & Weather report indicates that 80 percent of the crop was still in good to excellent condition. Ninety percent of the crop had tasseled and 75 percent silked – both slightly behind last year but ahead of the five-year average.
    I’ve heard several accounts -- both in Iowa and other states -- of longer than normal silks this year. I hope these accounts are rare! Silks elongate an inch or more per day until they intercept pollen and the ovules are fertilized. Six inches of silk extending from ears -- like I’ve seen in photos from central Iowa -- could indicate four to six days of growth without pollination occurring. Silks remain viable for up to 10 days and turn brown and separate from ovules when ovules are fertilized.
    Pollen shed and silking
    In older hybrids, pollen shed usually preceded silking. Since stress affects silking more than pollen shed, high temperatures, especially when coupled with moisture stress, resulted in barren ears. Pollen shed and silking usually happen simultaneously with modern hybrids and in many cases, silks may appear before pollen shed. This is one of the mechanisms that resulted in greater stress tolerance with modern hybrids. Silks develop first from near the butt of the ear and then proceed progressively to the tip.
    Pollen shed occurs first from anthers that protrude from near the tip of the main tassel stem. Subsequently, shed moves progressively down the main tassel and from the tips of tassel branches toward the main tassel stem. The last anthers to shed pollen are those on the lowest tassel branches near the main tassel stem. Incidentally, scientists record the time difference between pollen shed and silking as a measure of stress among hybrids and/or experimental treatments. We call this the anthesis-silking interval (ASI).
    What do long silks suggest?
    Silks stop growing and turn brown when ovules they attach to are fertilized. If all anthers on all plants have shed pollen and silks are still yellow-green and growing, kernels on the ear remain unfertilized. Harvestable kernel numbers will be reduced unless there is another source of pollen nearby. Yield potential will be compromised.
    Husk gently and shake ears
    Kernel set should be “easy” to determine after completion of pollen shed. As mentioned earlier, browning of silks indicates successful ovule fertilization. If yellow-green silks are obvious, gently remove husks to expose silks and kernels. Hold the ear horizontal and shake or roll it carefully. Silks will detach from fertilized ovules. Silks remaining attached to ovules indicate that those ovules were not fertilized and thus will not produce kernels. Tip kernels often are not fertilized

  2. #2
    Senior Member dennis1 is on a distinguished road
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    I thought it was going to be about "ladies under-garments", especially when you address ICF

  3. #3
    Senior Member ECI is on a distinguished road ECI's Avatar
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    Well guy's I went out and checked my corn this afternoon , not good !!!!!!! Check'd it out in two different spots and found that it figured out to 10 percent , and a kernal count on what look'd like a good ear and figured out to 10 percent did NOT pollinate on it .

    Think it's time to have a beer ! Ken
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  4. #4
    Banned Faust100F is on a distinguished road
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    Ken stop whining! it will still do 225 bu. just ask Larry, Moe, and Curley at USDA! Not that I want to bring it up, but you do need to put N on your corn crop to get the nubbins to fill out to the tip. I am sure db would be glad to counsel you on how and what to do when growing corn. Aren't you a corn college grad? Have a great day. LMAO! John

  5. #5
    Senior Member verbatime is on a distinguished road verbatime's Avatar
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    Ken, that picture on the right hand side... is that the pickup bed in the background or do your knuckles almost drag the ground when you walk?

  6. #6
    Senior Member ECI is on a distinguished road ECI's Avatar
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    is that the pickup bed in the background or do your knuckles almost drag the ground when you walk

    No Verb that was just a high spot in the road ! LOL

    No Really a friend was holding it down by theroad so we had something for back ground so you could see it .

  7. #7
    Senior Member ECI is on a distinguished road ECI's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Faust100F View Post
    Ken stop whining! it will still do 225 bu. just ask Larry, Moe, and Curley at USDA! Not that I want to bring it up, but you do need to put N on your corn crop to get the nubbins to fill out to the tip. I am sure db would be glad to counsel you on how and what to do when growing corn. Aren't you a corn college grad? Have a great day. LMAO! John
    No No John that was LA345 that was a top grad form corn college . They wouldn't even let me on the grounds !

    really that corn look'd great early and i put on 10 gallon of 10-34-0 , had 400 lb of 6-15-40 . and did a double sidedress , one pass at 30 gallon and then when corn got to V-7 put on another 30 gallons , the big problem has been the heat and NO rain .

    we did do a pop count in two different spots = 33,000 , row count and all that happy sh1t and then subtract'd the loos kernals on the corn and non pollinated corn , really hate to tell you what it came out to . One hint , Not good lol Ken

  8. #8
    Senior Member teaspoon is on a distinguished road
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    All that planning and hard work and mother nature screws with you for two weeks. There are going to be lots of pollination problems on fields that look good from the road

  9. #9
    Teaspoon I think you will be proven correct and that is not a good thing! ECI for what it is worth up until the heat wave in our little unfertile area of Illinois we were looking at 200+ bushels per acre! Which when all things are considered great for our area, but we have many ears that look just like yours and yield estimates are between 100 to 150. I know that we don't count for much of the corn belt but somebody had better start doing the math as there are a lot of good to poor acres that the excellent acres have to make up for. The corn gurus missed the mark wide last year and I think many will be surprised at how low the corn crop will be this year when all is said and done. Too hot at the critical tasseling period and there is not much we can do about it except plant earlier and this year that was not possible. Yep, driving down the road the crop has seldom looked better but we will now the real answer when we start shelling.

  10. #10
    Senior Member ECI is on a distinguished road ECI's Avatar
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    SILFarmer , Same here ! corn is look'n great from the rosd , except the gravel , it's done , as in toast . that is why I put this up today , as you know how important it is to go out and check your fields it is alot worse than they thought , anyway here it is .

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