AgWeb Farm Journal Legacy Project Top Producer Dairy Today Beef Today Pro Farmer Ag Day TV US Farm Report MyMachinery.com Ultimate Farm Quest
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 28
  1. #11
    Senior Member glowplug is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    18,532
    Put me in ECI's camp on Cyclops POS planters. Okay if you want to make a Cyclo into a 15" soybean planter. Forget about planting corn with one.

    Option 1 - Find a good used JD 7000, 7200 or Kinze. Toss the meters and replace with Precision Meters. A great corn planter is primarily about accurate meters and good openers to create a good seed trench. Follow that with a good trench closing system that matches your soils and conditions.

    Option 2 - Find a good used White 6100. Great planter.

    I walk excellent stands coming from JD, Kinze, or White planters but attention to detail is what makes these planters meter and place seed. I have nothing against the CaseIH 1200, etc. series but there aren't very many around here due to lack of dealers. And the JD and Kinze finger p.u. planters basically blew away the Cyclos years back so IH never recovered that lost market share.

    Happy iron hunting village...........Glowplug

  2. #12
    Senior Member villageidiot is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,296
    I've been running the fan on the 900 direct off the hydralics, been using the cih mx120 the last two years, does seem to draw the flow down quite a bit, when you raise and lower the planter, the air pressure really would drop. Sounds like if I want to use my older tractors, better stick to a meter planter, except maybe a white with the pto pump.

    The case 2394 does have tires, 165 drawbar horsepower, been having hydralic flow problems with it, back at dealer again for the 3rd time, should have traded it off. Problem with the older stuff is that alot of the mechanics at the dealers now have no clue with them, just what they were taught about the new stuff.

  3. #13
    Senior Member jabber1 is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    6,165
    If hydraulic capacity of the planting tractor is a concern, the finger pickup system on the Kinzes and some of the Deeres is a great option. Vs the air systems, The finger meters are typically higher maintenance to keep accurate yet they do a great job. It is nice to be able to throttle a tractor down for corners, ends, etc and not worry about vac pressure.

    Don't forget the price of parts when buying used. I have always purchased used planters but have always spent a lot of time comparing wear and cost to get into shape before I buy. If you get the planter from a dealer, might consider negotiating a big parts discount for the first 12 months.

  4. #14
    Senior Member NE sandhiller is on a distinguished road NE sandhiller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NE
    Posts
    1,125
    Quote Originally Posted by villageidiot View Post
    The case 2394 does have tires, 165 drawbar horsepower, been having hydralic flow problems with it, back at dealer again for the 3rd time, should have traded it off. Problem with the older stuff is that alot of the mechanics at the dealers now have no clue with them, just what they were taught about the new stuff.
    VI, if memory serves you're in southern NE somewhere toward the eastern side? I have a relative here in SW NE that works on nothing but J.I. Case. He is pretty much the go-to guy if you have a problem with a Case tractor here. Maybe too far to haul the old girl but just an FYI. Let me know if you want contact info.

    Good luck.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Normande is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,776
    We're using an 8100 white and the seed plate size can cause lots of trouble, ran one size off on one hybrid and it F'd up the stand big time. The BTO here has a 24r 1200CiH and it plants like adream, but it has all the bells and whistles.

  6. #16
    Senior Member dennis1 is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    7,498
    U of Nebraska saying that accurate exactly the same planting depth and covering of seed is WHAT makes the
    difference---just saying, some of the Cyclops POS were the ones used in the highest dryland corn yields in this
    county this year--and we are NEXT to the desert....admittedly our yields are NOT what u better corn growers
    expect every year. The article stated that emergence at the same time, rather than some variances in seed
    spacing, made more difference. and we plumbed ours direct to the tractor hydraulics, using a 4240 (green)
    and get along fine, BUT the neighbor used same planter with his German JD, his hired man had a hydraulic leak
    and never checked the fluid until I saw the dirt from the leak....now it is the problem of being driven by the
    tractor hydraulics, NOT the operator. It does run hotter, looking for a cooler off a JD windrower as a radiator
    to see if that will help that "problem".

    Now after patting myself on the back--the soybeans here didn't do as well as last year, I will still blame that on
    the weather---no, NOT planted with a planter...

  7. #17
    Senior Member GREG1 is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    759
    The following errors occurred with your submission
    You do not have permission to perform this action. Please refresh the page and login before trying again.
    .Okay Quick Reply

    .heh villageidiot, I had a 8 row JD 7000 with bubble coulters and kinze fertilizer openers. A good planter but transporting sucked. Markers sucked. Spent a $1000 every year rebuilding something but it was a good planter and very reliable if you maintained it. A John Blue sqeeze pump served me well. Traded it for a blow job and loved it, regardless what everybody else says about the case ih pos planters. I could run 6 1/2 mph with the red and 5 mph with the green one and there was no difference in the drop. I think the faster I went the better the drop with the red one. They recomend higher speeds to get the proper pop anyway. I had a pto pump and never had any problems. Took off the no-tll coulters and got perfect seed depth which I could not get with the JD 7000 in no-till conditions.

    There is a lot of bs associated with all these planters. I think it all boils down to how well you can set one up and have the end results with as little trouble as possible. Ken is the perfect example with his tricked up 7200. I'm sure his planter works perfectly. I have a 1200 series planter now and I have had a sheet load of trouble with this planter but I have stayed the course. The first year was so bad I would've traded it for a wore out 7000. It is an excellent no-till planter but the spacing is still not as advertised. I think the JD 1790 is the best on spacing, but I'm sure those Kinze guys will dispute that. Again, it all depends on how well you can set your planter.

    I still think we have a ways to go yet on planter design and simplicity. There are so many different options and there are more every year. That JD 7000 is looking better every year, or maybe that vaccum 7200 or how about that Kinze 2600 split row with precision units? I'm actually cornfused. My next planter will be a JD 1790 split row when I can afford a JD 8430. That might be awhile.


    This stupid web page causes me more grief. I have to copy and paste because my permission time ran out or something to that effect. Too much bs!! It's always something!!

  8. #18
    Senior Member 48 is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NW KS
    Posts
    18,892
    Quote Originally Posted by villageidiot View Post
    Need to upgrade planter, not alot of cash to spend, also Aunt took a farm away to give a grandson, sooo, only cover around 750 acres. Wanting to go from a IH 900 8-row to a twelve row machine to match a 6 row corn head on the 1480. (sucks to loose 30% of my acres.)

    Considering looking at a JD 7300, see the area dealers have about 8 of them ranging from 6000 to 11000. Maybe hoping to buy one private that has been taken care of. (I'd stick to an 8 row maybe if I could find a deal on a 883 like someone on the board did a while ago. Thought about an older Kinzie as well, but are harder to find around here. Someone told me the Deere's and the Kinzies of that age are very similar.

    I believe 48 mentioned the 7300 planters awhile back, would appreciate some input on what to look for. Wanting to find one with row cleaners and starter fert.


    would have posted under planting equip, but those threads down there don't seem to get alot of action. Thanks.

    By the way , also looking for an older spray coupe (early 90's) with 60 ft booms. Would prefer a 4 wheeler but prolly would use a 3 wheeler.

    Would be nice not to be on such a tight budget, but the hogs sucked away the cash the last 3 years. Was looking forward to fewer pigs, more crops, then kaboom, lost some ground.

    Thanks guys.
    VI: I went back to your original post cuz as the discussion evolved people started talking about 16R etc. If you have been using a 900 successfully in no till, disregard what I'm going to say. The problem is the little closing disks that push the seed slice back together fb the big flotation tire. This concept is the absolute best for conventional till. But, it is the absolute worst for no till cuz those little closing disks ride up and over old corn stalks or whatever residue and don't close the seed slice. Same applies to newer 1200/1250. If you want to use CIH 800/900/950/1200/1250 on no till...simply put JD closing wheels on them.

    I used to have a 2394. Very nice tractor. I don't know if it's got enough hydraulic flow to run a 12R JD vacuum. Just get the gpm from JD and see what the 2394 has. And...remember that on CIH the No.1 hydraulic takes priority over everything...including the 3pt hitch. On any hydraulic motor whether it is an Ace pump or vacuum or whatever, you want them to spin to a stop instead of abrupt stop that can shear shafts. What you want to do is push them into float to turn them off.

    No matter what breed you run...on a continuous running hydraulic motor, always run the hydraulics gravity flow back to the reservoir or the fluid will get too hot and cost you a transmission.

    Nothing out there will give you a better picket fence stand than a finger p/u...whether JD or Kinze. But, they are a lot of work to calibrate. You need a .006 feeler guage to set the clearance to the backing plate. This backing plate will corrode and pit from seed treatment chemicals...so unless you tore the meters down after corn planting and blew them out...plan on replacing these plates every year. The fingers work fine on an irrigated population of say 32,000 but not on a dryland population of 14,000. What you do is cut off every other finger and and adjust the planter transmission to run faster. Also, the cup on fingers is designed for ROUNDS. I always plant MF so they go to bottom of the seed slice without having to use sword dxcks=firmers. On MF the seed is NOT under the cup but wedged back against the rod. But, they still plant picket fence. Personally, everything SI Precision says sounds good but I'm not impressed.

    I would recommend vacuum to make life a lot simpler. BTW, the CIH with the old drum would blow SB peat moss inoculant right out the holes. If you use liquid Celltech...which you should be anyway...that's not a problem.

    I can not recommend White. One neighbor had a 16R fold up and the electronics never worked right. Another neighbor didn't park his in the shop...or put the seed meters in the shop and the UV sunlight screwed them up.

    As far as I'm concerned a JD planter is the only way to go. Having said that, they are a cheap sheet metal POS that you have to go thru every year...and make sure you have a wire welder. But, they do the best job planting. Kinze is just identical after JD's patent ran out.

    Matching the number of rows to the corn head is not nearly as important as matching the number of rows of a strip till unit to the planter. You want the stalks leaning the same direction. But, having said that, all my BTO neighbors run 12R Orthman 1-Tripper Strip Til rigs cuz that's all their tractors can pull and JD 16R stackfold planters on an Orthman tool bar.

    And...don't ever buy a tricycle Spra-Coupe. They were notorious for turning over on turns. The water in the tank goes to one side and over you go. Get the wide spacing and pull the axles out of the front frame and slide 3/8 plate in on both sides. Pry out with a bar and weld unused holes shut, or they will crack across the holes...especially irrigation sprinkler tracks but badger holes also.

  9. #19
    Senior Member 48 is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NW KS
    Posts
    18,892
    BTW, the Spra-Coupe front axles have a coil spring inside and run on 80/90. You can't keep the seals in. Don't waste money trying to fix. Just unscrew the fill bolt and keep full.

  10. #20
    Senior Member 4450 is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    NC Kansas
    Posts
    1,555
    Quote Originally Posted by dennis1 View Post


    Now after patting myself on the back--the soybeans here didn't do as well as last year, I will still blame that on
    the weather---no, NOT planted with a planter...

    What didn't you like with the drill, Dennis. Too thick or didn't get a stand? I heard a guy once say he thought 30 inch beans handled dry weather better than drilled. The beans I drilled last two years were solid, but I'm going back to 15 inch this year. Like to get the canopy as quick as possible, but will plant with the planter the fields without terraces so that I can run up the rows to spray them.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
AgWeb Farm Journal Legacy Project Top Producer Dairy Today Beef Today Pro Farmer Ag Day TV US Farm Report MyMachinery.com Ultimate Farm Quest