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  1. #1
    Senior Member 48 is on a distinguished road
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    Open Pollinated Corn

    I planted conventional, non RR, public SB from Ohio State=Dennison 3.5 this year so I could legally save the seed for my own use. I had no rain in Jul/Aug/Sep. SB are the most drought tolerant crop there is. It just amazed me how well they did. It's not going to be a bumper crop. But, I can fill my Forward Contract and have plenty of seed for next year. This will cut my input cost tremendously.

    Next year I am planting Open Pollinated corn=Reid's Yellow Dent and Krugs, so I can legally save my own seed. The dryland corn that my Lessee planted was expensive RR triple stack. It made 55 bu/a. OP corn could have made the same yield at tremendously lower input cost.

    OP corn tops out at 160bu/a, so it's not suitable for our high yield 240-270 irrigated fields. But, it is imminently applicable to our dryland fields that top out at 150bu/a with lots of rain.

    Frank Kutka, currently at NDSU, is the foremost expert on OP corn in the US that I know of. Here is a link to a new website that he started:

    [url]http://www.cornculture.info/[/url]

    BTW, Frank is not just into OP corn. You can learn how to breed your own hybrids.
    Last edited by 48; 09-10-2010 at 04:47 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member 48 is on a distinguished road
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    We have Palmer Amaranth, Horseweed (Marestail), and now increasingly Kochia resistant to glyphosate. So, Cobra is required in SB. In C 1/2#ATZ+8oz Banvel before 5" solves this problem. Aztec works better than any BTRW. HERO=Mustang+Capture will work on adult RW Beetle and ECB.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Iowa55 is on a distinguished road
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    48: they still have a few boths availible at Husker Harvest days for your seed booth.

  4. #4
    Senior Member 48 is on a distinguished road
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    Never been but I hear it is primarily irrigated. Plus, I would have to drive into...yuk...Nebraska$$. lol. If I had any brains, I'd plant this whole farm to Sudan and run stockers. Now...there's a hybrid that I would like to grow my own seed.

  5. #5
    Banned Faust100F is on a distinguished road
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    48 - I still have last years open pollinated Reids and Minnesota 13 on hand. I am going to Dakota, hopefully, within the next few weeks, I am going to contact this fella, I plan on getting my OP planted this next year if we do not have another "drouth" like ISU said we were going to have again this year. Thanks for the Info. John

  6. #6
    Senior Member glowplug is on a distinguished road
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    Don't forget when you harvest your OP corn, you will do visual judgements on each ear as to which ones will be the gene pool for next year's seed.

    Seed corn must be dried down on the cob. Once dry, shell as gently as possible so you don't damage the germ point. Metal is a no-no in seed production. Commercial seed corn is harvested gently with Pixall sweet corn harvesters, with all harvest phases kept on rubber and plastic for gentle handling.

    You will need to grade your seed so you have uniform sized seed. This is important for even emergence of next year's crop. Personally, I'd throw out small rounds (the runt pigs of seed corn) and large rounds (slow to emerge. Seed needs to absorb 30% of its weight in moisture to germinate. Large rounds svck.)

    Now, are you goind to have your seed treated for planting? Or wait until the soil is warm like the organic guys? And dumping Counter, Aztec, etc. in the row ain't the same as seed treatment.

    Good luck guys, lots of things to consider as you perfect the Faust 365 brand..........

    Glowplug

  7. #7
    Banned Faust100F is on a distinguished road
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    GP - I only plant the 365 day variety OP Corn, it is plenty dry when I harvest it the following April, and then turn around and plant it the next month after harvest. I think they are just making raising corn too complicated just to sell high priced seed and chemicals.

    I think 48's 160 bu. dryland OP seed corn is excellent, when you consider the input costs associated with growing it, not bad when the average corn yield in the US will be about 163 bu. to the acre. I think 48 will make more money with his own seed corn than the tripple dipple cowboys will.

    I mean . . . there is no premium at the elevator for raising GMO (other than high oil) corn that costs $125 an acre for seed, and OP corn that costs $4 an acre for seed the farmer holds back.

    Of course . . . I am sure the Corn College will disagree with me, I am sure they will also tell the neophyte corn "Growers" that you need all the bells and whistles in the combine too, in order to harvest your crop. With RR resistance growing in weeds, there is no reason for a farmer to pay $50 a bag for seed beans when he can hold back Non RR seed he raises for current market prices of $10 a bushel.

    In two years you can save back your RR1 Seed for replanting, but it will not matter, since you will be needing to use the old Chemicals like Classic, Poast, or Cobra to control the resistant weeds, or just use a cultivator if you are still planting in 30 inch rows. I think more and more farmers are tired of being gouged by the seed companies, especially when the RR2 beans yield less than the RR1, plus you still have the Roundup resistant weeds that requires conventional soybean herbicides anyway.

    Adios Amigos. John

  8. #8
    Senior Member glowplug is on a distinguished road
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    Faust, I have no quarrel with guys wanting to grow their own OP seed. But the details I passed on in my post, show growing your own is not easy if you do it right. Seed is a living organism and it needs tender loving care from harvest through planting, or you end up with a W T F experience.

    I think most seed companies provide good value for the dollars we invest in their products (except a certain lawsuit happy squiggly one that prefers our money go to lawyers instead of into research). If anyone is gouging farmers, it is the fertilizer companies. A ton of urea doesn't do any more than it did years ago. No improvment unlike the much better hybrids today than we had years ago.

    Well good luck with your PP harvest, Faust. Keep your head down. There's snipers in the trees........

    Glowplug

  9. #9
    Senior Member Normande is on a distinguished road
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    Good to here that your beans did well 48, was wandering when they would be coming off. After this years crop of RR2's will have to plant op next year and figure on small grains after in my pasture renovation next year. will say rr2's yeild look to be improved buy lower pops, final count was 75000plants/acre yet we still got over 900 pods/yd2, branch like crazy better than RR1's. Grew up near a man that produced his own hybrid, still used the old metal equipment, made high quailty seeds, but you still have to dry seed corn on the cob in the crib.

  10. #10
    Senior Member glowplug is on a distinguished road
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    Normande,

    I'm making similar observations on the RR2Y varieties. I planted 140,000 in 15" rows. Looks like 95% germinated so I may cut another 10,000 off the seeding rate. Branching and pods are huge with these new genetics.

    Caution on using metal in seed production. Keep it to a minimum. Stress cracks in seed will greatly diminish the population in next year's stand. Treat seed as little fragile babies because they are little fragile babies. Nor would I comingle in a crib. Lay the ears out on a flat surface to dry. Select the best ears from the healthiest spots in the field.

    It's a lot of work growing seed. But it was the most educational summer job I ever had when I was promoted from detassling to corn breeder's assistant.

    Glowplug

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